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I am new to C, and am having some fun playing around with bitwise operations. What I am doing seems to work, I am just wondering if it is considered good style.

Alright so let's say my program has 3 command-line options, -a, -b, and -c. Previously I would have had 3 ints act as booleans, say aFlag, bFlag, and cFlag. Then when I call my processOpts( int *aFlag, int *bFlag, int *cFlag) function, I would pass &aFlag, &bFlag, and &cFlag as arguments, and set them like *aFlag = 1.

Here's my new approach: have 1 int *options to represent all of the options, and treat it like an array of booleans. So to set them in the function:

case 'a':
  *options |= 1;
  break;
case 'b':
  *options |= 2;
  break;
case 'c':
  *options |= 4;
  break;

Then, back in main (or wherever), when I want to test to see if an option is chosen:

if ( *options & 1 )
  // Option 'a' selected

if ( *options & 2 )
  // Option 'b' selected

if ( *options & 4 )
  // Option 'c' selected

My question is: which method is considered better style? The first way could be more clear and less error-prone, whereas the second would probably make for easier refactoring (no need to change function prototype, as it's just one int).

Or, is there an even better way to do this? :D

EDIT: added breaks per Mat's suggestion.

Thanks for all the responses, I am quite impressed with this community and its willingness to help everybody learn—you guys rock!

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4  
don't forget to break between your cases –  Mat Mar 27 '11 at 20:50
1  
Can you do bit fields in raw c? struct someStruct { int flaga:1; int flagb:1}; etc? (I've pretty much always used c++ compilers) –  forsvarir Mar 27 '11 at 20:52
1  
@forsvarir: Bit fields are a c construct. I think c++ inherited them without change. –  dmckee Mar 27 '11 at 20:54

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using a single variable to represent a set of boolean flags works well if they are related. In general, I'd avoid doing this if the flags were not related. However in your case where the 3 flags relate to the program and how it runs, I'd say this is a good use.

As far as the implementation goes, rather than using hard coded constant values for your flags, you should define macros or an enum to represent the flags. That way it is clear that you are setting (or unsetting) which flag. Though it's probably not necessary to use pointers here as you have in your code.

e.g.,

enum option
{
    OPTION_none = 0,
    OPTION_a = 0x1,
    OPTION_b = 0x2,
    OPTION_c = 0x4,
};

enum option processOpts(int argc, char **argv)
{
    enum option options = OPTION_none;
    if (argc > 1)
    {
        int i;
        for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
        {
            if (argv[i][0] == '-')
            {
                switch (argv[i][1])
                {
                case 'a': options |= OPTION_a; break;
                case 'b': options |= OPTION_b; break;
                case 'c': options |= OPTION_c; break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return options;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    enum option options = processOpts(argc, argv);
    if (options & OPTION_a)
    {
        /* do stuff for option a */
    }
    if (options & OPTION_b)
    {
        /* do stuff for option b */
    }
    if (options & OPTION_c)
    {
        /* do stuff for option c */
    }
    return 0;
}
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Is processOpts' return type supposed to be void? What would be the correct return type? –  Fred Mar 27 '11 at 21:49
    
@Alex: Ooops, sorry, that should not be void, it should be returning enum option (in this example). –  Jeff Mercado Mar 27 '11 at 21:57

The better way to do this is to use an unsigned integer type to represent a collection of flags. Otherwise, your new approach is in many respects far superior to a bunch of individual flags.

Of course, the bit-masks that correspond to each option should be represented by named constants instead of "magic numbers" (1, 2, 4...) in the middle of the code.

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This is fine - you're just packing bits into an int - the only suggestion I would make is that 1, 2, 4 etc should be symbolic constants, and not literal hard-coded values as above, e.g.

enum {
    OPTION_A = 1 << 0,
    OPTION_B = 1 << 1,
    OPTION_C = 1 << 2,
};
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Using bit flags is imho better style - because it can easily be extended if you happen to need more command line options.

However, I'd strongly recommend you not to use plain, magic numbers - instead, do something like this:

#define OPTION_A 1
#define OPTION_B 2 ...

if (*options & OPTION_A) {
}

this makes checking for options more or less self-explaining, while bitwise ops with raw numbers always smell a bit like hidden magic.

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Your new approach (with an unsigned variable) is usual (and idiomatic).

It is usual to define the 1, 2, and 4 etc with an enum (or #define) and give them names

enum {
    OPTION_LEFT_TO_RIGHT = 1,
    OPTION_TOP_TO_BOTTOM = 2,
    OPTION_BOTTOM_TO_TOP = 4,
    OPTION_RIGHT_TO_LEFT = 8,
};

.

case 'a': *options |= OPTION_BOTTOM_TO_TOP; break;

.

if (*options & OPTION_RIGHT_TO_LEFT) { /* ... */ }
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As I suggested in my comment, my preference would be to use a bit fields to do this. For me, it has a slightly more intuitive usage, whilst allowing the compiler to do most of the work for me (checking the assembly output at least with my compiler confirms it is doing the expected and/or operations when checking/setting flags). So, taking Jeff M's solution as a starting point, I'd alter it to look like this:

// Assume TRUE defined as 1

struct option
{
    unsigned int OptionA : 1;  // defines 1 bit for option A flag
    unsigned int OptionB : 1;  // next bit is for option B
    unsigned int OptionC : 1;  // note, you can define more than one bit per flag
                               // if more complex options are required.
};

struct option processOpts(int argc, char **argv)
{
    struct option options = {0,0,0};  // explicit setting of all flags to false
                                      // compiler optimizes to options=0
    if (argc > 1)
    {
        int i;
        for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
        {
            if (argv[i][0] == '-')
            {
                switch (argv[i][1])
                {
                case 'a': options.OptionA = TRUE; break;
                case 'b': options.OptionB = TRUE; break;
                case 'c': options.OptionC = TRUE; break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return options;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    struct option options = processOpts(argc, argv);
    if (options.OptionA)
    {
        /* do stuff for option a */
    }
    if (options.OptionB)
    {
        /* do stuff for option b */
    }
    if (options.OptionC)
    {
        /* do stuff for option c */
    }
    return 0;
}
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The way you have wriggled yourself to is an outstanding way. It might even be the "best" way. Congratulations! Well done.

-- pete

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The usual approach to parsing command line options is to use getopt(). A good example of its usage can be found in the 5 source.

Note that while getopt() conforms to POSIX.2 and POSIX.1-2001, getopt_long() is a GNU extension and should IMO be avoided.

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And also note that GNU getopt does not conform to POSIX. (It permutes argv) –  R.. Mar 28 '11 at 5:11
    
@R.: True, unless the environment variable POSIXLY_CORRECT is set. –  Philip Mar 28 '11 at 10:20
    
A conformant program can unset any environment variable it wants (except a few like PATH, and even then it only matters if it needs to exec the standard utilities). And many conformant programs will, for security, unset all environment variables. The only way the GNU extension could be conformant is if it were off-by-default and turned on by a reserved-namespace environment variable. –  R.. Mar 28 '11 at 15:27
    
@R.: I agree with what you say. One question though: how is security influenced by unsetting all environment variables? The only security risk I can see here is reading from an environment variable without making sure that it actually represents a legal value, thus introducing the possibility for an attacker to write arbitrary data on the stack. Am I missing something here? –  Philip Mar 28 '11 at 21:16
    
Well if a program is running suid for instance, it will want to close all potential windows for the user invoking the program to deliver input or affect the program's operation (or the operation of any of its descendants). –  R.. Mar 28 '11 at 21:38

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