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Let me start off by saying that I'm pretty new to flex and action script. Anyways, I'm trying to create a custom event to take a selected employee and populate a form. The event is being dispatched (the dispatchEvent(event) is returning true) but the breakpoints set inside of the handler are never being hit.

Here is some snippets of my code (Logically Arranged for better understanding):

Employee Form Custom Component

<mx:Metadata>
     [Event(name="selectEmployeeEvent", type="events.EmployeeEvent")]
<mx:Metadata>
<mx:Script>
   [Bindable]
   public var selectedEmployee:Employee;
</mx:Script>
...Form Fields

Application

<mx:DataGrid id="grdEmployees" width="160" height="268"
			itemClick="EmployeeClicked(event);">
<custom:EmployeeForm
     selectEmployeeEvent="SelectEmployeeEventHandler(event)"
     selectedEmployee="{selectedEmployee}" />

<mx:Script>
    [Bindable]
private var selectedEmployee:Employee;

private function EmployeeClicked(event:ListEvent):void
    {
     var employeeData:Employee;
     employeeData = event.itemRenderer.data as Employee;
     var employeeEventObject:EmployeeEvent = 
             new EmployeeEvent( "selectEmployeeEvent", employeeData);
     var test:Boolean = dispatchEvent(employeeEventObject);
         //test == true in debugger
}
    private function SelectEmployeeEventHandler(event:EmployeeEvent):void
    {
         selectedEmployee = event.Employee; //This event never fires
    }



</mx:Script>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are a few things conspiring to cause trouble here. :)

First, this declaration in your custom component:

<mx:Metadata>
     [Event(name="selectEmployeeEvent", type="events.EmployeeEvent")]
<mx:Metadata>

... announces to the compiler that your custom component dispatches this particular event, but you're actually dispatching it with your containing document, rather than your custom component -- so your event listener never gets called, because there's nothing set up to call it.

Another thing is that, in list-item-selection situations like this one, the more typical behavior is to extract the object from the selectedItem property of the currentTarget of the ListEvent (i.e., your grid -- and currentTarget rather than target, because of the way event bubbling works). In your case, the selectedItem property of the grid should contain an Employee object (assuming your grid's dataProvider is an ArrayCollection of Employee objects), so you'd reference it directly this way:

private function employeeClicked(event:ListEvent):void
{
   var employee:Employee = event.currentTarget.selectedItem as Employee;
   dispatchEvent(new EmployeeEvent("selectEmployeeEvent"), employee);
}

Using the itemRenderer as a source of data is sort of notoriously unreliable, since item renderers are visual elements that get reused by the framework in ways you can't always predict. It's much safer, instead, to pull the item from the event directly as I've demonstrated above -- in which case you wouldn't need an "employeeData" object at all, since you'd already have the Employee object.

Perhaps, though, it might be better to suggest an approach that's more in line with the way the framework operates -- one in which no event dispatching is necessary because of the data-binding features you get out-of-the-box with the framework. For example, in your containing document:

<mx:Script>
    <![CDATA[

    	import mx.events.ListEvent;

    	[Bindable]
    	private var selectedEmployee:Employee;

    	private function dgEmployees_itemClick(event:ListEvent):void
    	{
    		selectedEmployee = event.currentTarget.selectedItem as Employee;
    	}

    ]]>
</mx:Script>

<mx:DataGrid id="dgEmployees" dataProvider="{someArrayCollectionOfEmployees}" itemClick="dgEmployees_itemClick(event)" />

<custom:EmployeeForm selectedEmployee="{selectedEmployee}" />

... you'd define a selectedEmployee member, marked as Bindable, which you set in the DataGrid's itemClick handler. That way, the binding expression you've specified on the EmployeeForm will make sure the form always has a reference to the selected employee. Then, in the form itself:

<mx:Script>
    <![CDATA[

    	[Bindable]
    	[Inspectable]
    	public var selectedEmployee:Employee;

    ]]>
</mx:Script>

<mx:Form>
    <mx:FormItem label="Name">
    	<mx:TextInput text="{selectedEmployee.name}" />
    </mx:FormItem>
</mx:Form>

... you simply accept the selected employee (which is marked bindable again, to ensure the form fields always have the most recent information about that selected employee).

Does this make sense? I might be oversimplifying given that I've no familiarity with the requirements of your application, but it's such a common scenario that I figured I'd throw an alternative out there just for illustration, to give you a better understanding of the conventional way of handling it.

If for some reason you do need to dispatch a custom event, though, in addition to simply setting the selected item -- e.g., if there are other components listening for that event -- then the dispatchEvent call you've specified should be fine, so long as you understand it's the containing document that's dispatching the event, so anyone wishing to be notified of it would need to attach a specific listener to that document:

yourContainingDoc.addEventListener("selectEmployeeEvent", yourOtherComponentsSelectionHandler);

Hope it helps -- feel free to post comments and I'll keep an eye out.

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You're dispatching the event from the class in the lower code sample (DataGrid, I guess), but the event is defined in the EmployeeForm class, and the event handler is likewise attached to the EmployeeForm instance. To the best of my knowledge, events propagate up in the hierarchy, not down, so when you fire the event from the form's parent, it will never trigger handlers in the form itself. Either fire the event from the form or attach the event handler to the parent component.

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