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I am trying to populate a linked list after reading from a file. It simply hangs when i run it. I know the problem is associated with the assignment of &course (I may be wrong). Any guidance would be much appreciated.

Course course;//this one to read from file
Course* fileCourse = new Course();//this populates linked list
fstream Read("Courses.dat", ios::in | ios::binary);
if(!Read)
    cout << "Error Reading from file Courses.dat\n" << endl;
else
{
    Read.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&course), sizeof(Course));
    fileCourse->setNextCourse(&course);//problem here perhaps?
    while(Read && !Read.eof())
    {
        Read.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&course), sizeof(Course));
        fileCourse->setNextCourse(&course);
        if(head == NULL)
        {
            head = fileCourse;
        }
        else
        {
            Course* tmp = head;

            tmp = tmp->getNextCourse();

            while(tmp->getNextCourse() != NULL)
            {
                tmp = tmp->getNextCourse();
            }
            tmp->setNextCourse(fileCourse);
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

  1. Is this homework? If so, tag it as such.
  2. To populate a linked list with n items (in this case, Course objects) you should know that n objects should be allocated with new Course(). How many objects are you allocating in this code?
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+1: exactly! Hopefully the OP can take this hint & find at least one major issue he needs to address... –  AAT Mar 27 '11 at 22:06
    
Objects are being created until Read.eof() is reached. And "homework" is not the word it is a major assignment and I needed help with that particular section. I apologize if indeed it was unethical. –  Donald Tyson Mar 27 '11 at 23:20
    
@DonaldTyson: The code you posted creates exactly two objects (course and fileCourse). Of those, one is a local and will not survive after this code goes out of scope. So in effect you are creating exactly one object here. See the problem? –  Jon Mar 27 '11 at 23:39

If course is not POD (Plain Old Data) in taht it has member functions, pointers, etc embedded you may not be able to to write it byte for byte for a file and then read it in and expect to have a valid object. You need to serialize the data upon save and then deserialize it back to a valid object on load. This is sometimes done by overloading the stream operators << and >> to output/input the class to a file. Common data formats for serializing include XML or JSON, or even just binary data without any pointers.

The errors you are encountering are probably similar to what is being reported in this question: C++ Reading Objects from File Error

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The problem did lie in the fact that after reading the Course object from file, it was not valid as is. I was forced to call the primary constructor and making a new object from the data like this. fileCourse = newCourse(course.getName(), course.getCode()); –  Donald Tyson Mar 27 '11 at 23:16

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