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I have the following code fragment

System.out.printf("%b\n", 123);

which prints "true".

Can somebody explain this behavior? shouldn't this throw a IllegalFormatException?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well since the specification says:

"If the argument arg is null, then the result is "false". If arg is a boolean or Boolean, then the result is the string returned by String.valueOf(). Otherwise, the result is "true". " (src)

The behavior is quite expected isn't it? Why they decided to implement it that way - no idea, I'd agree that it's not intuitive (but well it follows C which also prints just anything if you give it the wrong arguments ;) )

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so, the 123 is boxed? or is it treated as a regular int? – Mahmoud Hossam Mar 27 '11 at 21:43
2  
@Mahmoud: As printf takes an Object... as the last parameter, all primitive arguments are boxed, yes. But anything which is not a boolean (or null) would get formatted to "true" here. – Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 27 '11 at 21:51
    
@paulo thanks a lot :) – Mahmoud Hossam Mar 27 '11 at 21:56

From the JavaDocs:

If the argument arg is null, then the result is "false". If arg is a boolean or Boolean, then the result is the string returned by String.valueOf(). Otherwise, the result is "true".

The argument you're giving it isn't null, boolean, or Boolean, so it falls under "Otherwise" and therefore is true

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