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Why doesn't a TRUNCATE on mygroup work? Event hough I have ON DELETE CASCADE SET I get:

ERROR 1701 (42000): Cannot truncate a table referenced in a foreign key constraint (mytest.instance, CONSTRAINT instance_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (GroupID) REFERENCES mytest.mygroup (ID))

drop database mytest;
create database mytest;
use mytest;

CREATE TABLE mygroup (
ID      INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE instance (
ID                   INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
GroupID                 INT NOT NULL,
DateTime             DATETIME DEFAULT NULL,
FOREIGN KEY     (GroupID) REFERENCES mygroup(ID) ON DELETE CASCADE,
UNIQUE(GroupID)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;
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2  
I agree with @kitsched. –  Gustavo Straube Oct 5 '12 at 18:35
7  
please change the best answer –  opengrid Oct 22 '12 at 9:14
6  
Just another reminder to change the "best answer" to user447951's answer... –  Xethron May 24 '13 at 10:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 63 down vote accepted

You cannot TRUNCATE a table that has FK constraints applied on it (truncate is not the same as delete).

To work around:

Option 1 which does not risk damage to data integrity:

  1. Remove constraints
  2. Perform TRUNCATE
  3. Delete manually the rows that now have references to "nowhere"
  4. Create constraints

Option 2, suggested by user447951 in his answer, which is bad practice. Use it if you are OK risking damage to data integrity

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0; 
TRUNCATE table1; 
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;
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43  
Actually, sir, no. user447951 has showed us the light! –  steve Nov 1 '12 at 2:33
5  
@barjonah: actually, it might break data integrity (see stackoverflow.com/questions/5452760/…). So, what you call "light" in the real world is considered to be a bad practice. PS: thanks for the downvote –  zerkms Nov 1 '12 at 2:59
    
ok. you're right my friend. I take it back. edit your answer so I can upvote –  steve Nov 1 '12 at 9:42
    
stackoverflow won't let me reverse my downvote unless you edit the answer (insert a character or something). I need to upvote your answer, pls –  steve Nov 1 '12 at 21:34
    
@barjonah: no worries, it doesn't worth it :-) –  zerkms Nov 1 '12 at 21:35
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YES you can:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;
TRUNCATE table1;
TRUNCATE table2;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;

With these statements, you risk letting in rows into your tables that do not adhere to the foreign key constraints.

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13  
do we have to set SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1; again afterwards? –  vinc3m1 Apr 9 '12 at 21:29
37  
No, you don't. The setting is only valid during the connection. As soon as you disconnect, the next connection will have it set back to 1. –  Pelle ten Cate Jun 27 '12 at 8:07
5  
This does not apply the 'ON DELETE' event in the referenced table, so this is not a complete answer. –  Omer Sabic Oct 16 '12 at 9:09
14  
+1 This is very handy during development when your data is already broken... –  Cypher May 9 '13 at 22:37
2  
This is a great answer. Perfect for development! –  enchance Aug 20 '13 at 9:02
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As per mysql documentation, TRUNCATE cannot be used on tables with foreign key relationships. There is no complete alternative AFAIK.

Dropping the contraint still does not invoke the ON DELETE and ON UPDATE. The only solution I can ATM think of is to either:

  • delete all rows, drop the foreign keys, truncate, recreate keys
  • delete all rows, reset auto_increment (if used)

It would seem TRUNCATE in MySQL is not a complete feature yet (it also does not invoke triggers).

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protected by undefined is not a function Oct 4 '13 at 8:59

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