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I'm reading Effective C# (Second Edition) and it talks about method inlining.

I understand the principle, but I don't see how it would work based on the 2 examples in the book. The book says:

Inlining means to substitute the body of a function for the function call.

Fair enough, so if I have a method, and its call:

public string SayHiTo(string name)
{
    return "Hi " + name;
}

public void Welcome()
{
    var msg = SayHiTo("Sergi");
}

the JIT compiler might (will?) inline it to:

public void Welcome()
{
    var msg = "Hi " + "Sergi";
}

Now, with these two examples (verbatim from the book):

Example 1

// readonly name property
public string Name { get; private set; }

// access:
string val = Obj.Name;

Example 2

string val = "Default Name";
if(Obj != null)
    val = Obj.Name;

The book mentions the code but doesn't go any further into how they might be inlined. How would the JIT compiler inline these 2 examples?

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The question is currently very broad, answering the following would help: What is the book stating the resulting inlining will be? Why do you think it will not work? –  earlNameless Mar 27 '11 at 22:26
    
by compiler you mean JITer compiler? –  lukas Mar 27 '11 at 22:30
    
@earlNameless, @lukas - The book mentions these two examples and doesn't state further how it will be inlined, hence my question. Yes, I mean the JIT compiler. I've updated my question to make these points clear, thank you. –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 28 '11 at 7:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Automatic properties are syntactic sugar for field-backed properties.

Properties are syntactic sugar for setter and/or getter methods.

Hence the code you give is more or less equivalent to:

private string _name;
public string get_Name()
{
  return _name;
}
private void set_Name(string value)
{
  _name = value;
}

Then string val = Obj.Name becomes equivalent to string val = Obj.get_Name() which can be inlined to string val = Obj._name.

Likewise the code

string val = "Default Name";
if(Obj != null)
  val = Obj.Name;

Is is equivalent to:

string val = "Default Name";
if(Obj != null)
  val = Obj.get_Name();

Which can be inlined to:

string val = "Default Name";
if(Obj != null)
  val = Obj._name;

Note that private and public apply to compilation, not to execution, so while the fact that the backing field is private would make Obj._name illegal outside of the class in question, the equivalent code produced by inlining, is allowed.

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Great answer, thanks! –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 28 '11 at 14:25

Hypothetically speaking, inlining here would unwrap the body of get_Name() that's auto-generated by the compiler, which simply returns a private backing field. It might look something like this:

string val = Obj.k__BackingField;
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4  
Indeed. In practice of course, the C# compiler does not do any inlining, which is instead deferred to the JIT. At the JIT level, there is no longer a difference between method calls and property accesses – both can be inlined similarly. –  Joren Mar 27 '11 at 23:32
    
It isn't hypothetical. –  Hans Passant Mar 28 '11 at 0:07
    
@Hans I have no idea whether it would actually do that in this case, so it's hypothetical for me. –  Rex M Mar 28 '11 at 0:50

Inlining takes places after accessibility checks, so it can optimize code in ways that you can't with simple source substitution.

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