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In the past I've stuck common properties, such as the current user, onto ViewData/ViewBag in a global fashion by having all Controllers inherit from a common base controller.

This allowed my to use IoC on the base controller and not just reach out into global shared for such data.

I'm wondering if there is an alternate way of inserting this kind of code into the MVC pipeline?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Un-tried by me, but you might look at registering your views and then setting the view data during the activation process.

Because views are registered on-the-fly, the registration syntax doesn't help you with connecting to the Activated event, so you'd need to set it up in a Module:

class SetViewBagItemsModule : Module
{
    protected override void AttachToComponentRegistration(
        IComponentRegistration registration,
        IComponentRegistry registry)
    {
        if (typeof(WebViewPage).IsAssignableFrom(registration.Activator.LimitType))
        {
            registration.Activated += (s, e) => {
                ((WebViewPage)e.Instance).ViewBag.Global = "global";
            };
        }
    }
}

This might be one of those "only tool's a hammer"-type suggestions from me; there may be simpler MVC-enabled ways to get at it.

Edit: Alternate, less code approach - just attach to the Controller

public class SetViewBagItemsModule: Module
{
    protected override void AttachToComponentRegistration(IComponentRegistry cr,
                                                      IComponentRegistration reg)
    {
        Type limitType = reg.Activator.LimitType;
        if (typeof(Controller).IsAssignableFrom(limitType))
        {
            registration.Activated += (s, e) =>
            {
                dynamic viewBag = ((Controller)e.Instance).ViewBag;
                viewBag.Config = e.Context.Resolve<Config>();
                viewBag.Identity = e.Context.Resolve<IIdentity>();
            };
        }
    }
}

Edit 2: Another approach that works directly from the controller registration code:

builder.RegisterControllers(asm)
    .OnActivated(e => {
        dynamic viewBag = ((Controller)e.Instance).ViewBag;
        viewBag.Config = e.Context.Resolve<Config>();
        viewBag.Identity = e.Context.Resolve<IIdentity>();
    });
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Exactly what I needed. Updated the answer to work out of the box –  Scott Weinstein Apr 19 '11 at 15:03
    
Great stuff - based on your approach I've added another simplification, this time without the need for a module. –  Nicholas Blumhardt Apr 19 '11 at 21:26
    
what's the Resolve part of e.Context.Resolve? I should mention I'm used to Ninject... –  drzaus Dec 9 '14 at 22:26

The best way is using ActionFilterAttribute and register your custom class in your global. asax (Application_Start)

public class UserProfilePictureActionFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
{

    public override void OnResultExecuting(ResultExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.Controller.ViewBag.IsAuthenticated = MembershipService.IsAuthenticated;
        filterContext.Controller.ViewBag.IsAdmin = MembershipService.IsAdmin;

        var userProfile = MembershipService.GetCurrentUserProfile();
        if (userProfile != null)
        {
            filterContext.Controller.ViewBag.Avatar = userProfile.Picture;
        }
    }

}

register your custom class in your global. asax (Application_Start)

protected void Application_Start()
    {
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

        GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new UserProfilePictureActionFilter(), 0);

    }

Then you can use it in all views

@ViewBag.IsAdmin
@ViewBag.IsAuthenticated
@ViewBag.Avatar
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5  
I don't understand why this hasn't been upvoted more; it's a much less invasive approach than the others –  joshcomley Apr 15 '14 at 14:33
3  
8 hours of research to find this...the perfect answer. Thank you so much. –  deltree May 8 '14 at 23:12
3  
Perfect! I would vote 100 time Up if I could –  EdsonF Jun 8 '14 at 11:49
2  
+1 Nice and clean way to integrate global data. I used this technique to register my site version across all pages. –  Will Bickford Aug 14 '14 at 15:38
2  
Brilliant, easy and unobtrusive solution. –  Eugen Timm Sep 1 '14 at 21:33

Since ViewBag properties are, by definition, tied to the view presentation and any light view logic that may be necessary, I'd create a base WebViewPage and set the properties on page initialization. It's very similar to the concept of a base controller for repeated logic and common functionality, but for your views:

    public abstract class ApplicationViewPage<T> : WebViewPage<T>
    {
        protected override void InitializePage()
        {
            SetViewBagDefaultProperties();
            base.InitializePage();
        }

        private void SetViewBagDefaultProperties()
        {
            ViewBag.GlobalProperty = "MyValue";
        }
    }

And then in \Views\Web.config, set the pageBaseType property:

<system.web.webPages.razor>
    <host factoryType="System.Web.Mvc.MvcWebRazorHostFactory, System.Web.Mvc, Version=3.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
    <pages pageBaseType="MyNamespace.ApplicationViewPage">
      <namespaces>
        <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc" />
        <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Ajax" />
        <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Html" />
        <add namespace="System.Web.Routing" />
      </namespaces>
    </pages>
  </system.web.webPages.razor>
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The problem with this setup is that if you're setting the value to a property in the ViewBag on one view and then trying to access it on another view (like your shared _Layout view), the value value set on the first view will be lost on the layout view. –  Pedro Mar 19 '12 at 15:35
    
@Pedro that's definitely true, but then I'd argue that ViewBag isn't meant to be a persistent source of state in the application. Sounds like you would want that data in session state and then you could pull that out in your base view page and set it in the ViewBag if it exists. –  Brandon Linton Mar 19 '12 at 16:13
    
You have a valid point but pretty much everyone uses data set in one view in other views; like when you set the title of the page in one view and your shared layout view then prints it out in the <title> tags of the html document. I even like to take this a step further by setting booleans like "ViewBag.DataTablesJs" in a "child" view to make the "master" layout view include the proper JS references on the html's head. As long as it is layout related, I think it is ok to do this. –  Pedro Mar 23 '12 at 19:42
    
@Pedro well in the title tags situation, usually that's handled with each view setting a ViewBag.Title property and then the only thing in the shared layout is <title>@ViewBag.Title</title>. It wouldn't really be appropriate for something like a base application view page since each view is distinct, and the base view page would be for data that is truly common across all views. –  Brandon Linton Mar 24 '12 at 14:31
    
@Pedro I understand what you are saying and I think Brandon missed the point there. I was using a custom WebViewPage and I tried to pass some data from one of the views to the layout view using a custom property in the custom WebViewPage. When I set the property in the view, it would update the ViewData in my custom WebViewPage but when it got to the layout view, the ViewData entry was already lost. I got around it by using ViewContext.Controller.ViewData["SomeValue"] in the custom WebViewPage. I hope it helps someone. –  Imran Rashid Apr 9 '14 at 13:55

Brandon's post is right on the money. As a matter of fact, I would take this a step further and say that you should just add your common objects as properties of the base WebViewPage so you don't have to cast items from the ViewBag in every single View. I do my CurrentUser setup this way.

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+1 good point! I hadn't thought of that :) –  Brandon Linton Apr 12 '11 at 18:39
    
I couldn't get this to work with the error 'ASP._Page_Views_Shared__Layout_cshtml' does not contain a definition for 'MyProp' and no extension method 'MyProp' accepting a first argument of type 'ASP._Page_Views_Shared__Layout_cshtml' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Sprintstar Sep 27 '13 at 12:26

You could use a custom ActionResult:

public class  GlobalView : ActionResult 
{
    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        context.Controller.ViewData["Global"] = "global";
    }
}

Or even a ActionFilter:

public class  GlobalView : ActionFilterAttribute 
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.Result = new ViewResult() {ViewData = new ViewDataDictionary()};

        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }
}

Had an MVC 2 project open but both techniques still apply with minor changes.

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If you want compile time checking and intellisense for the properties in your views then the ViewBag isn't the way to go.

Consider a BaseViewModel class and have your other view models inherit from this class, eg:

Base ViewModel

public class BaseViewModel
{
    public bool IsAdmin { get; set; }

    public BaseViewModel(IUserService userService)
    {
        IsAdmin = userService.IsAdmin;
    }
}

View specific ViewModel

public class WidgetViewModel : BaseViewModel
{
    public string WidgetName { get; set;}
}

Now view code can access the property directly in the view

<p>Is Admin: @Model.IsAdmin</p>
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