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I think this will be a bit esoteric but wanted to throw this out there in case anyone's tried anything like this, or if someone's already tried and found it to be impossible.

We have a table that needs a uniqueness constraint on a certain set of columns, but it also has a "soft delete" indicator. Records that have been marked as "deleted" should not be included in the uniqueness check.

That's all fine, I could solve this easily with a unique function-based index. However, what complicates matters is that if we're going to implement this constraint in the database, it must be a deferred constraint, because of the way Hibernate works. If it can't be done, we'll have to omit the constraint, and I'd prefer not to if at all possible.

For example:

CREATE TABLE jkemp_test
  ( id NUMBER NOT NULL
  , deleted_ind CHAR(1) DEFAULT 'N' NOT NULL);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX jkemp_test_funique
  ON jkemp_test
  (CASE WHEN deleted_ind = 'N' THEN id END);

-- make this use the function-based index, maybe?
ALTER TABLE jkemp_test
  ADD CONSTRAINT jkemp_test_unique
  UNIQUE (id)
  DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

INSERT INTO jkemp_test VALUES (1,'N');
INSERT INTO jkemp_test VALUES (2,'N');

COMMIT;

UPDATE jkemp_test SET deleted_ind='Y' WHERE id=1;

COMMIT;

-- depending on whether the constraint is deferred or not, either
-- the insert or the commit will fail "unique constraint violated"

INSERT INTO jkemp_test VALUES (1,'N');
COMMIT;

A win-win scenario would be for the last commit to succeed, while still allowing the constraint to be deferred. (I'm aware that the existence of the unique index means that the constraint is not currently deferred.)

Our only option at the moment is to implement the constraint using the application, which will not be as reliable. Also, we don't want to change the data model too much (e.g. we could move the deleted rows to a different table, e.g. JKEMP_TEST_DELETED, but that would involve too much complication in the application).

This is on Oracle 11.2.0.1.0.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This works in the 11.2.0.2 behind apex.oracle.com. It SHOULD work in 11.2.0.1 (and maybe in 11.1, but not in 10g as virtual colums were an 11g enhancement)

Credit to Lucas Jellma

CREATE TABLE jkemp_test
  ( id NUMBER NOT NULL
  , deleted_ind CHAR(1) DEFAULT 'N' NOT NULL);

alter table jkemp_test
ADD (active_id AS (CASE WHEN deleted_ind = 'N' THEN id END))
/

ALTER TABLE jkemp_test
  ADD CONSTRAINT jkemp_test_unique
  UNIQUE (active_id)
  DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

You do have to specify the column list for the inserts, as the derived column (virtual column) shouldn't be specified. I'm pretty sure that hibernate is fine with having columns it doesn't touch.

INSERT INTO jkemp_test (id, deleted_ind) VALUES (1,'N');
INSERT INTO jkemp_test (id, deleted_ind) VALUES (2,'N');

COMMIT;

UPDATE jkemp_test SET deleted_ind='Y' WHERE id=1;

COMMIT;

INSERT INTO jkemp_test (id, deleted_ind) VALUES (1,'N');
share|improve this answer
    
+1 very nice, I didn't think of a computed column. Thanks! –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 28 '11 at 5:15

Jeff,

Here is one way to implement the requirement that would work in versions prior to 11g also.

DROP MATERIALIZED VIEW MV_JKEMP ;
DROP MATERIALIZED VIEW LOG ON jkemp_test ;
DROP TABLE JKEMP_TEST ;

CREATE TABLE jkemp_test
  ( id NUMBER NOT NULL
  , deleted_ind CHAR(1) DEFAULT 'N' NOT NULL);

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW LOG ON jkemp_test WITH ROWID ;

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW MV_JKEMP
REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT
AS
SELECT JT1.ROWID r1, JT2.ROWID r2
FROM JKEMP_TEST JT1, JKEMP_TEST JT2
WHERE JT1.ID = JT2.ID
 AND JT1.DELETED_IND = JT2.DELETED_IND
 AND JT1.ROWID != JT2.ROWID
 AND JT1.DELETED_IND = 'N' ;

ALTER TABLE MV_JKEMP ADD CONSTRAINT MV_CHECK CHECK (R1 IS NULL OR R2 IS NULL)


INSERT INTO jkemp_test VALUES (1,'N');
INSERT INTO jkemp_test VALUES (2,'N');
COMMIT;
UPDATE jkemp_test SET deleted_ind='Y' WHERE id=1 AND deleted_ind = 'N';
COMMIT;
SELECT * FROM JKEMP_TEST ;
SELECT * FROM MV_JKEMP;
INSERT INTO JKEMP_TEST VALUES (1,'N');
COMMIT;

SELECT * FROM JKEMP_TEST ;
SELECT * FROM MV_JKEMP;

-- The following will succeed on the INSERT but fail on COMMIT
INSERT INTO JKEMP_TEST VALUES (1,'N');
COMMIT;

-- The following will succeed
INSERT INTO JKEMP_TEST VALUES (3,'N');
COMMIT;

SELECT * FROM JKEMP_TEST ;
SELECT * FROM MV_JKEMP;

-- The following will succeed
UPDATE JKEMP_TEST SET DELETED_IND='Y' WHERE ID=1 AND DELETED_IND = 'N';
COMMIT;

SELECT * FROM JKEMP_TEST ;
SELECT * FROM MV_JKEMP;

DELETE FROM JKEMP_TEST ;
COMMIT;

The above was tested on 10.2.0.1.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 tested and passed: very nice workaround for pre-11g versions. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 30 '11 at 3:12

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