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I'm using Jsoup for sanitizing user input from a form. The form in question contains a <textarea> that expects plain text. When the form is submitted, I clean the input with Jsoup.clean(textareaContents); however, since html ignores extra whitespace, Jsoup.clean() will remove valuable whitespace characters from the input.

For example, if someone entered some lines of text in the textarea:

hello

test

after Jsoup.clean(), you will have:

hello test

How can you make Jsoup.clean() preserve whitespace? I know it's designed for parsing html and this isn't html, so is there a better alternative?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your textarea just expects plain text, then I think you'd be better off just HTML escaping the plain text. I.e. convert user's input < and > tags to &lt; and &gt; respectively. Either on input our output (input might be safer so you only need to think about it once).

The jsoup HTML cleaner is, as you say, designed to parse untrusted input HTML and outuput trusted HTML, where formatting is done with elements.

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For future generations, if you still need to get access to original text with whitespace, you can use TextNode.getWholeText() method.

Sample code:

/**
 * @param cell element that contains whitespace formatting
 * @return
 */
public static String getText(Element cell) {
    String text = null;
    List<Node> childNodes = cell.childNodes();
    if (childNodes.size() > 0) {
        Node childNode = childNodes.get(0);
        if (childNode instanceof TextNode) {
            text = ((TextNode)childNode).getWholeText();
        }
    }
    if (text == null) {
        text = cell.text();
    }
    return text;
}

In the code above, we assume that the passed in element contains text content directly inside element body (we take the first node). If that is not so, it will fall back to regular Element.text() method.

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