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Here's what I'm trying:

foreach_in.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + VARIABLE + "in" + list_obj + ")";
foreach_as.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + list_obj + "as" + VARIABLE + ")";
for_loop.Rule = ToTerm("for") + "(" + simple_assignment + ";" + comparison + ";" + assignment + ")";
if_condition.Rule = ToTerm("if") + "(" + comparison + ")";
if_else.Rule = if_condition + block + "else"; // <-- PROBLEM
preset_directive.Rule = foreach_in | foreach_as | for_loop | if_else | if_condition;
directive.Rule = preset_directive | custom_directive;
directive_blk.Rule = directive + block;

But I get a shift-reduce conflict. I'm not quite sure why... shouldn't it greedily grab the "else" if it can? Not quite sure how else to define an else block such that it can only be followed by an "if" block.

I think an if_else block node with an if node and an else node would be optimal because then I don't have to go back and check the previous sibling when I try traverse the AST.

If you need to see more of the grammar...just let me know. A "block" is basically defined as { blah } (a bunch of statements between {}).


Trying it as an optional block:

custom_directive_kw.Rule = ToTerm("custom_directive1") | "custom_directive2";
custom_directive.Rule = custom_directive_kw + free_args_opt;
foreach_in.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + variable + "in" + list_obj + ")" + block;
foreach_as.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + list_obj + "as" + variable + ")" + block;
for_loop.Rule = ToTerm("for") + "(" + simple_assignment + ";" + comparison + ";" + assignment + ")" + block;
if_condition.Rule = ToTerm("if") + "(" + comparison + ")" + block + else_blk_opt;
else_blk.Rule = "else" + block;
else_blk_opt.Rule = else_blk | Empty;
preset_directive.Rule = foreach_in | foreach_as | for_loop | if_condition;
directive.Rule = preset_directive | custom_directive;
directive_blk.Rule = directive;

Doesn't like that either. Still throws the warning.

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1  
This is typical of the "dangling else" problem. Consider "if (...) then if then (...) ... else ..." which "if" does the "else" belong to? The parser generator is telling you it can't decide. The classic solution is to force the "else" to bind to the nearest "if". For LALR parser generators, this is done by telling the generator to "shift" on the "else" keyword, but not to "reduce". And you apparantly found the answer. –  Ira Baxter Mar 28 '11 at 10:13
    
@Ira: Yeah.. I didn't see the ambiguity at first, but that's a good example. –  Mark Mar 28 '11 at 23:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nevermind... Irony has this magical PreferShiftHere() function that does the trick.

foreach_in.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + variable + "in" + list_obj + ")" + block;
foreach_as.Rule = ToTerm("foreach") + "(" + list_obj + "as" + variable + ")" + block;
for_loop.Rule = ToTerm("for") + "(" + simple_assignment + ";" + comparison + ";" + assignment + ")" + block;
if_condition.Rule = ToTerm("if") + "(" + comparison + ")" + block;
if_else.Rule = if_condition + PreferShiftHere() + "else" + block;
preset_directive.Rule = foreach_in | foreach_as | for_loop | if_else | if_condition;
directive_blk.Rule = preset_directive | custom_directive;
share|improve this answer
    
THis is the classic fix to the "dangling else" problem in virtually every LALR parser generator. –  Ira Baxter Mar 28 '11 at 10:11

I'm guessing here, but shouldn't you define the IF as:

if_condition.Rule = ToTerm("if") + "(" + comparison + ")" + block;

And then go on to define the else part as:

else_block.Rule = ToTerm("else") + block;

And Finally put it all together:

if_else.Rule = if_condition + else_block;

Once more, I'm guessing here, 'cause I haven't worked with EBNF yet.

share|improve this answer
    
I could try it that way... you'll notice on the last line I assume that every "directive" has a block so I put the + block there, but I can factor the blocks into each and omit the last line. Not sure if that'll resolve the ambiguity though. –  Mark Mar 28 '11 at 3:37
    
Nope. Still doesn't like that. Says "lookaheads [else]. Selected shift as preferred action." I don't quite know what that means..does that mean it'll consume the else if it can? Still prefer to avoid the warning... I think I'll have to redefine "if" to "if optionally followed by else". Edit: Doesn't like that either. I'm stumped. –  Mark Mar 28 '11 at 3:52

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