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I want to use a custom action filter to handle specific exceptions from my service classes to populate the model state and then return the view.

For example, take my previous code:

public ActionResult SomeAction(SomeViewModel model)
{
    try
    {
        _someService.SomeMethod(model);
    }
    catch (ServiceException ex)
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError(ex.Key, ex.ErrorMessage);
    }

    return View();
}

Basically, it would call a service, and if a ServiceException was thrown, it would know that there was an issue w/ the model data, and add the error to the ModelState, then just return the view. But I noticed some very un-DRY-like patterns, because I had this same try/catch code in every action method.

So, to DRY it up a bit, I basically created a new HandleServiceError action filter:

public class HandleServiceErrorAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute
{
    public override void OnException(ExceptionContext context)
    {
        ((Controller)context.Controller)
            .ModelState
            .AddModelError(
                ((ServiceException)context.Exception).Key, 
                ((ServiceException)context.Exception).ErrorMessage
            );
        context.ExceptionHandled = true;
    }
}

Then simplified my action methods like so:

public ActionResult SomeAction(SomeViewModel model)
{
    _someService.SomeMethod(model);
    return View();
}

Problem is, once the action filter handles the error, it doesn't return to my action method. I sort of understand, under the hood, why this is happening. But I would still like to figure out a way to do what I'm trying to do.

Is this possible?

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE:

I tried the suggestions from the article Darin provided in his answer, but ran into issues trying to use constructor injection with the controller's model state.

For example, if you look at their Controllers\ProductController.cs code, they have the controller's empty constructor using a service locator to create the service, passing in the controller's ModelState at that point:

public ProductController() 
{
    _service = new ProductService(new ModelStateWrapper(this.ModelState), 
                                  new ProductRepository());
}

But if you look at the injected constructor, it assumes the ModelState will be injected into the constructor for the service:

public ProductController(IProductService service)
{
    _service = service;
}

I don't know how to get CI to work with the current controller's ModelState. If I could figure this out, then this approach may work.

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1 Answer 1

You could still return the corresponding view:

context.Result = new ViewResult
{
    ViewName = context.RouteData.GetRequiredString("action")
};

You may also take a look at the following article for an alternative about how to perform validation at the service layer.

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1  
Thanks. I tried going down the path of using a ModelStateWrapper per that article, and it's turning out to be a pain with Unity IoC. I can't figure out how to inject my Controller.ModelState into my service layer. If I go from constructor injection to service locators, I may be able to do that, but I don't want to have to change over to service locators just for this. I've looked, and I'm not finding any elegant solutions to this (most of them seem hacked or way over complicated). –  Jerad Rose Mar 28 '11 at 18:02
    
I've updated my post w/ more information regarding this. Curious to see if there's a way to get this to work using constructor injection. –  Jerad Rose Jun 23 '11 at 15:22
    
The article's method requires you to check every service method's true-ness manually, and doesn't give any specific error information, just "pass or fail". Also, if you're calling multiple services in an action, or if one service calls another, you've got to check true-ness all the way up the stack. Jerad's original method, while requiring a try catch, is more elegant IMO. –  Josh Noe Jan 25 '13 at 18:59

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