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I have question regarding function use-cases,in which cases i should use which functions below?

void function(string k,string l)
{
    if(k!=null &l!=null)
    {
        //do some operation on k and l 
    }
}

void function(string k,string l)
{     
    //do some operation on k and l
    //i do understand that i get nullreference 
    //exceptions for null values of k and l
    //one use case i have seen this type of function: in a class
    //private methods when u are sure of passing non-null objects.
}


void function(string k,string l)
{     
    if (k==null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("k is null");
    if (k==null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("l is null");
        // do some operation on k and l
}

I have used string to demonstrate my point ,those args could any objects.

Please list use cases for each function.

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Provide little more context on what this function exactly does and how is it being used? is it exposed publically? is it private? based on these additional detials people can help you figure out which is suitable to you? All are correct, depends on what you want to do with them. –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 28 '11 at 6:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The last case is most useful in APIs and frameworks where consumers of the API require specific error messages in debugging. The second example is more common in application code where the application programmer can debug through the source, although often I'd still prefer the third solution.

The first solution should almost never be used. Only under circumstances where it's extremely clear to the caller that the code will not execute if the values are null should this kind of technique be used.

I suspect what you really want to know about (but don't know the words) is Design by Contract. DbC is a design technique/paradigm in which the developer sets up explicit contracts with callers following very specific rules regarding how inputs are handled and what is promised by each method. A well-formed contract will make it explicit to the caller exactly how the method will behave with any given input.

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Your question really is: where should I detect errors in arguments, and what should I do if I detect them -- in other words, who should handle the errors?

Where to detect: Case #1 and #3 detects in the subroutine. Case #2 detects by the caller (because the routine may not throw an exception upon argument errors -- it may execute, just providing wrong results)

Who handles: Case #1 handles in the subroutine. Case #2 and Case #3 handles by the caller.

My recommendation is always Case #3. Reasons:

  1. Case #1 failed silently. The caller may never know, unless you are returning an error code.
  2. Case #2 is too unpredictable, since the caller is responsible for both detection and handling. If the caller thinks that a call is OK, and you then change the implementation of the subroutine, it may break the calling code.

Suggestions with .NET: Install Code Contracts. This way, you get static checking of arguments. You can do:

string MyFunction (string k, string l)
{
    Contract.Requires(!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(k));
    Contract.Requires(!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(l));
    Contract.Ensures(!string.IsNull(Contract.Return<string>()));
         :
}
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In most of the cases I go for this:

void function(string k,string l)
{
 if(k!=null && l!=null)
  {
    //do some operation on k and l ..
  } else {
    //throw exception / other error handling...
  }
}

If there is a chance that the arguments could be null objects, its best to check them in beginning of your function and take necessary actions.

The above coding style is also a Java coding standard (where you compare !=null). the standards recommend using it over the == comparison for null.

Coding the function with no validations is not good. But for small projects and sure shoot functions, you can avoid the validation.

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Use: Handles a case where k or l are null by doing nothing. Used for cases where nothing should be done with invalid parameters.
Note: you probably meant && instead of &

void function(string k,string l)
{
 if(k!=null &l!=null)
   {
    //do some operation on k and l 
    }
}

Use: Ignores posibility that k or l are null. Used if you know, for sure, that k and l have been instantiated.

void function(string k,string l)
{     
   //do some operation on k and l
   //i do understand that i get nullreference 
   //exceptions for null values of k and l
   //one use case i have seen this type of function: in a class
  //private methods when u are sure of passing non-null objects.
}

Use: Handles case where k or l are null by forcing the calling location to handle the error. Used for cases where the function does not have enough knowledge to properly handle the error.

void function(string k,string l)
    {     
       if (k==null)
          throw new ArgumentNullException("k is null");
       if (k==null)
          throw new ArgumentNullException("l is null");
       // do some operation on k and l
    }
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first format: parameters may be null. In this use case you don't care which one was null, nor do you care about writing anything to the log file when such a case happens. This approach may lead to difficulties in case you need to debug this code since nothing is written to a log, not even 'debug' level.

second format: one use case as specified is private methods where parameters are validated earlier. Another one may be a case where you want to monitor cases where either k or l are null. These cases may be indication of a problem and you want upper layers to monitor them through a runtime exception.

third format: parameters may be null. In this use case you want to differentiate between the different cases since it is important for upper layer using this method to know which parameter cause this failure and perhaps handle it differently.

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