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Using mod on a big number, such as 600851475143, does not give a correct answer, anyone know why?

print 600851475143 / 2.0
print 600851475143 % 2.0
print 4 / 2.0
print 4 % 2.0

600851475143 / 2.0 = 300425737572.0
600851475143 % 2.0 = 1.0
4 / 2.0 = 2.0
4 % 2.0 = 0.0

I was working on creating my own prime number function and it works fine for smaller numbers, but modular seems to break when the numbers get bigger. I'm just messing around with python and the Euler challenge and have been banging my head against a wall for awhile now.

Thank you.

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1  
The big number ends with "3" and any number ending with 3 modulo 2 is 1. So that is correct. The first line you have given is incorrect, but I can't reproduce that here with python 3.2. Are you sure you showed the correct values? – Ocaso Protal Mar 28 '11 at 6:35
    
and why are you using 2.0 instead of just 2? – N 1.1 Mar 28 '11 at 6:44
    
You are correct regarding numbers ending with 3 modulo 2 will be 1, I should have seen that, but my version of python does not calculate the remainder when I do simple division which is what led me to my false conclusion. print 600851475143.0 / 2.0 returns 300425737572.0 – Jens Bodal Mar 28 '11 at 6:47
    
off question topic but since project euler was raised. Consider using a sieving method for getting primes for early euler problems e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes – DTing Mar 28 '11 at 6:51
    
I did a little testing, and 600851475143 / 2.0 indeed returns the wrong answer on Python 2.5 and 2.6. On Python 2.7 and 3.2 the answer is correct (didn't test 3.0 and 3.1). – dancek Mar 28 '11 at 7:52
>>> print 600851475143 / 2
300425737571
>>> print 600851475143 % 2
1
>>> 4 / 2
2
>>> 4 % 2
0

Apart from that: your issue has nothing to do with big numbers - it's only about integer operations in Python.

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