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Blocks are fine but what about writing C arrays?

Given this simplified situation:

CGPoint points[10];
[myArray forEachElementWithBlock:^(int idx) {
    points[idx] = CGPointMake(10, 20); // error here
    // Cannot refer to declaration with an array type inside block
}];

after searching a while found this possible solution, to put it in a struct:

__block struct {
    CGPoint points[100];
} pointStruct;

[myArray forEachElementWithBlock:^(int idx) {
    pointStruct.points[idx] = CGPointMake(10, 20);
}];

this would work but there is a little limitation I have to create the c array dynamically:

int count = [str countOccurencesOfString:@";"];
__block struct {
    CGPoint points[count]; // error here
    // Fields must have a constant size: 'variable length array in structure' extension will never be supported
} pointStruct;

How can I access my CGPoint array within a block?

OR

Is it even possible at all or do I have to rewrite the block method to get the full functionality?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Maybe you can allocate the array on the heap?

// Allocates a plain C array on the heap. The array will have
// [myArray count] items, each sized to fit a CGPoint.
CGPoint *points = calloc([myArray count], sizeof(CGPoint));
// Make sure the allocation succeded, you might want to insert
// some more graceful error handling here.
NSParameterAssert(points != NULL);

// Loop over myArray, doing whatever you want
[myArray forEachElementWithBlock:^(int idx) {
    points[idx] = …;
}];

// Free the memory taken by the C array. Of course you might
// want to do something else with the array, otherwise this
// excercise does not make much sense :)
free(points), points = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
Could you use a dispatch_sync call with someQueue after this to delete the array at the end instead? –  James Bedford Mar 28 '11 at 7:16
    
I think I don't have to use GCD because its a linear synchronous operation so I can simply delete it after my block call, or? Could you please explain what free() does and how should I delete the array afterwards? –  user207616 Mar 28 '11 at 7:38
    
Sorry, the dispatch_async was just an example, obviously not the best one. I’ll rewrite the answer to be closer to your actual code. –  zoul Mar 28 '11 at 7:43
    
How does this work given that by the time the code in the block gets executed, isn't it possible that points has been freed? Does GCD make a copy of points when you declare the block? –  James Bedford Mar 28 '11 at 7:51
1  
It is true that in this case the block is only used in this scope. However, in general, blocks can be copied and returned from the function and be used later when these variables no longer exist. In that case, this solution won't work and will overwrite arbitrary memory –  user102008 Nov 14 '11 at 2:44

Another simple answer which works for me is the following:

CGPoint points[10], *pointsPtr;
pointsPtr = points;
[myArray forEachElementWithBlock:^(int idx) {
    pointsPtr[idx] = CGPointMake(10, 20);
}];
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm unfamiliar with the , *pointsPtr and association. It creates a pointer but should I release anything at the end? –  user207616 Jun 22 '11 at 13:14
1  
You don't have to release anything. The pointer pointsPtr is a normal variable and its value is (after pointsPtr = points) the memory address of the first element of the array points. So when you declare points[10] the compiler reserves memory on the stack for 10 CGPoint's and then pointsPtr just points to this memory. Since you don't allocate any memory for pointsPtr on the heap with malloc/calloc there is nothing to release. This is why I prefer this method. BTW, I could have started my code with CGPoints points[10]; CGPoint *pointsPtr = points; which is exactly the same. –  cefstat Jun 23 '11 at 9:23
5  
It is true that in this case the block is only used in this scope. However, in general, blocks can be copied and returned from the function and be used later when these variables no longer exist. In that case, this solution won't work and will overwrite arbitrary memory –  user102008 Nov 14 '11 at 2:45

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