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I have a base class that looks as follows

public class base 
{
      public int x;
      public void adjust()
      {
           t = x*5;
      }
}

and a class deriving from it. Can I set x's value in the derived class's constructor and expect the adjust() function to use that value?

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Have you tried to? –  Snowbear Mar 28 '11 at 7:41
    
yea...the value is not being set. I thought I should make it some type of variable to enable that –  Aks Mar 28 '11 at 7:42
    
Then show us your full code. It should work, which means that there is a problem elsewhere. –  Vilx- Mar 28 '11 at 7:44
    
well, it means that you're doing something wrong because it should work as you expect. If only you're not calling adjust from base class constructor. Consider posting the code you've tried. –  Snowbear Mar 28 '11 at 7:45
    
ok. There is too much code to post. I'll see what I'm doing wrong. Thanks for your help –  Aks Mar 28 '11 at 7:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, that should work entirely as expected, even though your code sample does not quite make sense (what is t?). Let me provide a different example

class Base
{
    public int x = 3;
    public int GetValue() { return x * 5; }
}
class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived()
    {
        x = 4;
    }
}

If we use Base:

var b = new Base();
Console.WriteLine(b.GetValue()); // prints 15

...and if we use Derived:

var d = new Derived();
Console.WriteLine(d.GetValue()); // prints 20

One thing to note though is that if x is used in the Base constructor, setting it in the Derived constructor will have no effect:

class Base
{
    public int x = 3;
    private int xAndFour;
    public Base()
    {
        xAndFour = x + 4;
    }
    public int GetValue() { return xAndFour; }
}
class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived()
    {
        x = 4;
    }
}

In the above code sample, GetValue will return 7 for both Base and Derived.

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I just made up an example to explain that x is being used in the base class function :| –  Aks Mar 28 '11 at 7:48

Yes, it should work.

The following, slightly modified code will print 'Please, tell me the answer to life, the universe and everything!' 'Yeah, why not. Here you go: 42'

public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived()
    {
        x = 7;
    }
}

public class Base
{
    public int x;
    public int t;
    public void adjust()
    {
        t = x * 6;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Base a = new Derived();
        a.adjust();

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("'Please, tell me the answer to life, the universe and everything!' 'Yeah, why not. Here you go: {0}", a.t));
    }
}
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