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I saw this code before, but I don't know what the meaning:

var person1 = {
    toLocaleString : function(){
      return "Nikolaos";
     },
    toString : function(){
      return "Nicholas";
    }
}

var person2 = {
   toLocaleString : function(){
      return "bum";
   },
   toString : function(){
       return "Greg";
   } 

}

var people = [person1, person2];
alert(people.toString());
alert(people.toLocaleString());

does the function create an object with the method of toLocaleString and toString??or...??

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can't test this so i'm not totally sure but i don't tink this supposed to work, should be people[0].toString() or people[1].toString() –  Han Dijk Mar 28 '11 at 8:13
    
Your question is a bit unclear to me. What do you want to know? Maybe you should have a look at the toString documentation: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  Felix Kling Mar 28 '11 at 8:19
    
@Han here you go: jsfiddle.net/yahavbr/MgMaP –  Shadow Wizard Mar 28 '11 at 8:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That code is doing three things:

  1. Using object literal syntax to create object instances
  2. Using anonymous function expressions to create functions and bind them to properties on the objects. (Functions are first-class objects in JavaScript, so you can keep references to them, pass the references around, etc.)
  3. Specifically, it's overriding two standard functions that all JavaScript objects inherit from the Object prototype.

Let's break it down a bit.

1) Object literal notation:

var obj = {propName: propValue};

The { and } in this case denote an object literal. Within an object literal, you can write propName: propValue to assign propValue to the property with the name propName on the object. This is the same as:

var obj = {};             // Get an empty object
obj.propName = propValue; // Add a property to it

You can do multiple properties separated with commas. So for instance:

var obj = {
    author: "Douglas Adams",
    title:  "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy",
    answer: 42
};

That creates an object with three properties, two with string values and one with a number value.

Note that the right-hand side are processed just like an assignment, and so can be anything that can appear on the right-hand side of an assignment statement:

var x = "bar";
var obj = {
    three: 1 + 2,
    fubar: "foo " + x
};

The property names can be put in quotes if you like:

var x = "bar";
var obj = {
    "three": 1 + 2,
    "fubar": "foo " + x
};

...which is handy for specifying properties that have the names of reserved tokens (like "if", or "return") or formerly-reserved tokens (like "class") where it would be a syntax error if they weren't in quotes.

2) Now let's look at function expressions:

var f = function() { /* your code here */ };

That's a function expression. It creates a new function and assigns a reference to it to the variable f. You can call it by calling f().

var f = function(name) {
    alert("Hi " + name);
};
f("Fred"); // alerts "Hi Fred"

1 + 2) So putting it together with object literal notation:

var obj = {
    foo: function(name) {
        alert("Hi " + name);
    }
};
obj.foo("Fred"); // alerts "Hi Fred"

(I don't like anonymous functions, I prefer my functions to have names, but that's another topic.)

3) And finally: As maerics pointed out, the specific functions that are being used in that code are toString and toLocaleString, both of which are standard functions of JavaScript objects. That means that those will override the standard version and so return the given values whenever the standard function would have been called.

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2  
There is never a +2 button when you need one ... ;-) –  Aaron Digulla Mar 28 '11 at 9:14

The toString() and toLocaleString() methods are implemented for all JavaScript objects by the specification of the language. So arrays (such as the one stored in the "people" variable) seem to implement those methods by returning each of their elements' string or "locale string" value, respectively (at least, in the web browsers we are testing).

That is, the Array class toString and toLocaleString methods must be implemented with something like:

Array.prototype.toString = function() {
  var a = [];
  for (var i=0; i<this.length; i++) {
    a[i] = this[i].toString(); // Note "toString".
  }
  return a.join(",");
}

Array.prototype.toLocaleString = function() {
  var a = [];
  for (var i=0; i<this.length; i++) {
    a[i] = this[i].toLocaleString(); // Note "toLocaleString".
  }
  return a.join(",");
}
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What is that prototype method doing there? I never understood that one. –  Michael Koper Mar 28 '11 at 8:35
    
so, what does th toLocaleString and toString properties defined in the function, what is that for?? –  dramasea Mar 28 '11 at 8:38
2  
@Michael: The prototype is the basis of inheritance in JavaScript. It's a property on all functions, and it's used if the function is used as a constructor function via the new keyword. The object referenced by the function's prototype property is assigned as the prototype of the object created by the function, which means in essence that the object has access to all of the properties on the object (including -- significantly -- the properties that refer to functions). –  T.J. Crowder Mar 28 '11 at 8:41
    
@dramasea: There is no toString defined in the function. What do you mean by that? –  Felix Kling Mar 28 '11 at 8:44
    
ops, sorry i mean object –  dramasea Mar 28 '11 at 8:48

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