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I wonder to find out the codes of the function "sys_access", but i could only find it`s declare:(in include\Syscalls.h)

asmlinkage long sys_access(const char __user *filename, int mode);

i guess it coded by Assemble, but how could i found that?
by the way , i use the source insight to read the linux kernel...it cannot find the symbol in file *.S . Is there more effective tools to read the linux kernel?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I assume that you have already downloaded kernel sources (not only headers). This function is implemented in C and placed in fs/open.c:

SYSCALL_DEFINE3(faccessat, int, dfd, const char __user *, filename, int, mode)
{
     ...
}

SYSCALL_DEFINE2(access, const char __user *, filename, int, mode)
{
        return sys_faccessat(AT_FDCWD, filename, mode);
}

There are a bunch of methods to search trough files contents. In simple cases I prefer the usage of grep:

$> grep -r "access" /usr/src/linux-2.6/*
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I already have the whole kernel sources. grep will get so many results....i think SYSCALL_DEFINE2 is a marco which make access to sys_access.The symbol will be built after linked.so i cann`t located the function like this... –  simpleton Mar 28 '11 at 9:29
    
do you have some nice method to find the function like that? –  simpleton Mar 28 '11 at 9:30
    
It is grep. You can use any regular expression you want to make your search easy. For example: grep -r "SYSCALL_DEFINE.(.*acess.*" /usr/src/linux-2.6/*. Anyway, regardless of the tool you use to perform search you'll need regexps to find such things. –  maverik Mar 28 '11 at 9:38
1  
ctags can be very useful for navigating such source code. Or Doxygen. No regular expressions required. –  Johnsyweb Mar 28 '11 at 10:09
1  
@Johnsyweb: While I do like tagging tools, I don't think ctags will be able to recognize SYSCALL_DEFINEn(foo) as sys_foo. Is there a special configuration that helps with this? (btw, I personally found that GNU Global works well for the kernel source.) –  Karmastan Mar 28 '11 at 16:40
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