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I need a regular expression for validation two or one numbers then , or . and again two or one numbers.

So, these are valid inputs:

11,11  
11.11  
1.1  
1,1  
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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

\d{1,2}[\,.]{1}\d{1,2}

EDIT: update to meet the new requirements (comments) ;) EDIT: remove unnecesary qtfier as per Bryan

^[0-9]{1,2}([,.][0-9]{1,2})?$
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I'm sorry I didn't specified but the ,. and the numbers after its are not required.1 or 11 is also valid. –  user256034 Mar 28 '11 at 10:55
4  
^[0-9]{1,2}([,.]{1}[0-9]{1,2})?$ this will match 11 11,11 11.11 1.1 and it will not match 11. or 11.11.11. and its tested with perl altho it looks posix compliant to me so it should work with other regex engines –  sysfault Mar 28 '11 at 11:01
1  
The {1} is unnecessary. –  Bryan Oakley Mar 28 '11 at 11:12
    
@Bryan: right; consider it for clarity sake :P +1 –  sysfault Mar 28 '11 at 11:14
\d{1,2}[,.]\d{1,2}

\d means a digit, the {1,2} part means 1 or 2 of the previous character (\d in this case) and the [,.] part means either a comma or dot.

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I'm sorry I didn't specified but the ,. and the numbers after its are not required.1 or 11 is also valid. –  user256034 Mar 28 '11 at 10:56

\d means a digit in most languages. You can also use [0-9] in all languages. For the "period or comma" use [\.,]. Depending on your language you may need more backslashes based on how you quote the expression. Ultimately, the regular expression engine needs to see a single backslash.

* means "zero-or-more", so \d* and [0-9] mean "zero or more numbers". ? means "zero-or-one". With neither of those qualifiers it means exactly one. Most languages also let you use {m,n} to mean "betwen m and n" (ie: {1,2} means "between 1 and 2")

Since the dot or comma and additional numbers are optional, you can put them in a group and use the ? quantifier to mean "zero-or-one" of that group.

Putting that all together you can use:

\d{1,2}([\.,][\d{1,2}])?

Meaning, one or two digits \d{1,2}, followed by zero-or-one of a group (...)? consisting of a dot or comma followed by one or two digits [\.,]\d{1,2}

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