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I am new to python and am trying to pass an xml document (filled with documents for a solr instance) into a python dictionary. I am having trouble trying to actually accomplish this. I have tried using ElementTree and minidom but I can't seem to get the right results.

Here is my XML Structure:

<add>
    <doc>
        <field name="genLatitude">45.639968</field>
        <field name="carOfficeHoursEnd">2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z</field>
        <field name="genLongitude">5.879745</field>
    </doc>
    <doc>
        <field name="genLatitude">46.639968</field>
        <field name="carOfficeHoursEnd">2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z</field>
        <field name="genLongitude">6.879745</field>
    </doc>
</add>

And From this I need to turn it into a dictionary that looks like:

doc {
    "genLatitude": '45.639968',
    "carOfficeHoursEnd": '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z',
    "genLongitude": '5.879745',
    }

I am not too familiar with how dictionaries work but is there also a way to get all the "docs" into one dictionary.

cheers.

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4 Answers 4

import xml.etree.cElementTree as etree
from pprint import pprint

root = etree.fromstring(xmlstr) # or etree.parse(filename_or_file).getroot()

docs = [{f.attrib['name']: f.text for f in doc.iterfind('field[@name]')}
        for doc in root.iterfind('doc')]
pprint(docs)

Output

[{'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z',
  'genLatitude': '45.639968',
  'genLongitude': '5.879745'},
 {'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z',
  'genLatitude': '46.639968',
  'genLongitude': '6.879745'}]

Where xmlstr is:

xmlstr = """
<add>
    <doc>
        <field name="genLatitude">45.639968</field>
        <field name="carOfficeHoursEnd">2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z</field>
        <field name="genLongitude">5.879745</field>
    </doc>
    <doc>
        <field name="genLatitude">46.639968</field>
        <field name="carOfficeHoursEnd">2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z</field>
        <field name="genLongitude">6.879745</field>
    </doc>
</add>
"""
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Nice use of cElementTree and pprint, and dictionary comprehension too. Just be warned that that syntax is supported only from 2.7 onward. –  Giulio Piancastelli Mar 28 '11 at 22:41
1  
@Giulio Piancastelli: the dict comprehension can be replaced on Python < 2.7 by dict((f.attrib['name'], f.text) for f in doc.iterfind('field[@name]')) –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 28 '11 at 23:26

Solr can return a Python dictionary if you add wt=python to the request parameters. To convert this text response into a Python object, use ast.literal_eval(text_response).

This is much simpler than parsing the XML.

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This is the correct answer for Python. Thanks! –  Blender Dec 1 '12 at 1:29

A possible solution using ElementTree, with output pretty formatted for sake of example:

>>> import xml.etree.ElementTree as etree
>>> root = etree.parse(document).getroot()
>>> docs = []
>>> for doc in root.findall('doc'):
...   fields = {}
...   for field in doc:
...     fields[field.attrib['name']] = field.text
...   docs.append(fields)
... 
>>> print docs
[{'genLongitude': '5.879745',
  'genLatitude': '45.639968',
  'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z'},
 {'genLongitude': '6.879745',
  'genLatitude': '46.639968',
  'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z'}]

The XML document you show does not provide a way to distinguish each doc from the other, so I would maintain that a list is the best structure to collect each dictionary.

Indeed, if you want to insert each doc data into another dictionary, of course you can, but you need to choose a suitable key for that dictionary. For example, using the id Python provides for each object, you could write:

>>> docs = {}
>>> for doc in root.findall('doc'):
...   fields = {}
...   for field in doc:
...     fields[field.attrib['name']] = field.text
...   docs[id(fields)] = fields
... 
>>> print docs
{3076930796L: {'genLongitude': '6.879745',
               'genLatitude': '46.639968',
               'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z'},
 3076905540L: {'genLongitude': '5.879745',
               'genLatitude': '45.639968',
               'carOfficeHoursEnd': '2000-01-01T09:00:00.000Z'}}

This example is designed just to let you see how to use the outer dictionary. If you decide to go down this path, I would suggest you to find a meaningful and usable key instead of the obejct's memory address returned by id, which can change from run to run.

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1  
doc.iterfind('field[@name]') could be used instead of doc in the for-loop to avoid errors if the xml is changed in a non-significant way stackoverflow.com/questions/5457852/… –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 28 '11 at 15:58

It's risky to eval any string that comes from the outside directly into python. Who knows what's in there.

I'd suggest using the json interface. Something like:

import json
import urllib2

response_dict = json.loads(urllib2.urlopen('http://localhost:8080/solr/combined/select?wt=json&q=*&rows=1').read())

#to view the dict
print json.dumps(answer, indent=1)
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