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In my log file entries are logged with a start and end marker. Like below

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the first error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the second error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the third error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

At any given time say above 3 entries are there in the log file.
I want a regular expression to match only the last entry.

At present I am using the below reg-exp:
WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR\s*<<\*\*((.|\n)*)\*\*>>$

Now $1 contains every thing between start marker of the first entry and end marker of the last entry.
What I want is the content between the start and end marker of last entry. I am not concerned with other entries.

Can anyone please modify this reg-exp to suit my needs.

Edit: I am using perl reg-ex

Edit: I need to use reg-exp as I am using SEC for error log processing.

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5 Answers 5

Why use a regular expression when the bulk of your string matching is a simple linear search?

This can be solved much more simply by just using the last substring search of WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR

For example, in javascript (although this would be simple to implement in almost any language I can think of)

var log = "WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<** ... **>>",
    last = log.substr(log.lastIndexOf("WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR"));

How simple was that? Not to mention quicker, since lastIndexOf starts from the end of the string (which will scale for arbitrarily large log strings/files/streams), and we didn't need to build a state machine (i.e. construct a regular expression).

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I wish I could give more than +1 for this advice. –  Bryan Oakley Mar 28 '11 at 12:17
    
I have no other option but to use regular expression. I am using SEC(simple-evcorr.sourceforge.net/man.html) for log monitoring. –  Varun Mar 28 '11 at 12:25

You need to do a "non-greedy" match. * by default is greedy, meaning it will match as much as possible. Most languages use *? to mean a non-greedy or shortest possible match.

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You can also use negative lookahead to assert that it's the last log record:

m/WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<\*\*(?!.*WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<\*\*)(.*)\*\*>>/s

First you find the record header, then you assert that there's no more record header in this file, and finally you capture the real message in $1.

The result will be:

This is the third error
blah - blah - blah

The whole Perl will be:

if ($logfile =~ m/WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<\*\*(?!.*WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<\*\*)(.*)\*\*>>/s) {
    $last_record = $1;
} else {
    $last_record = "";
}
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Now I am using the below reg-exp: (?s)WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR\s*<<**(?!.*WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR)(.*)**>>$ But this is selecting the entire third entry twice in $1. Any thoughts? –  Varun Mar 28 '11 at 14:16

It could be that you are looking for \z as per regex to match EOF to match End Of File.

 WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR\s*<<\*\*((.|\n))\\*>>\z

(untested)

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Here is a way to do it:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $err;
while(<DATA>) {
    $err ='' if (/^WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <</);
    $err .= $_ if (/^WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <</ .. /^\*\*>>/);
}
print $err;

__DATA__
WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the first error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the second error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the third error
blah - blah - blah
**>>

output:

WY_LOG_TYPE_ERROR <<**
This is the third error
blah - blah - blah
**>>
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