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I have a c++ function read_inputdata to read some inputfile and write the values to a an array. I first declare an array of appropriate length, and with the function I fill it with the values in the inputfile.

But I get a segmentation fault. Anybody an idea what I did wrong?

#define MAX 140160
void read_inputdata(double input[MAX], char files[40]);

char inputfiles1[40] = "input/Hesse04/FR_Hes_rad.txt";
std::cout << "Declaring the arrays" << std::endl;
double input1[MAX];
std::cout << "Calling function read_inputdata" << std::endl;
read_inputdata(input1, inputfiles1);

When I compile and run this I get:

Declaring the arrays
Calling function read_inputdata
Segmentation fault

So at the moment he calls the function read_inputdata something goes wrong, because he doesn't reach std::cout << "In function read_inputdata" << std::endl;.

The function:

void read_inputdata(double input[MAX], char files[40])
{
    std::cout << "In function read_inputdata" << std::endl;
    std::ifstream inputfile;
    inputfile.open(files);
    if (inputfile.is_open())
    {
        char temp[100];
        double getal[2][MAX];
        int i = 0;
        while(!inputfile.getline(temp, 100).eof())
        {
            char delims[] = "\t ,";
            char *result = NULL;
            result = strtok( temp, delims );
            int j=0;
            while( result != NULL )
            {
                getal[j][i]=atof(result);
                result = strtok( NULL, delims );
                j++;
            }
            i++;
        }
        inputfile.close();
        for (int i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
        {
            input[i] = getal[1][i];
        }
    }
    else std::cout << "WARNING: unable to open file" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is there some reason you're not dynamically allocating the array? That's a fairly large size. –  jonsca Mar 28 '11 at 11:07
1  
This double getal[2][MAX]; declares an array that is several megabytes in size. Are you sure you have that much stack space on your system? –  Bo Persson Mar 28 '11 at 11:10
    
yes, indeed, when I tried with a smaller #define MAX 140160 it worked, so it has probably to do with the available space. Why I didn't allocate it dynamically? I tried, but it gave also some fault, and I am not a real experienced programmer in C++, so I gave it up. But I will try with the answer below. –  joris Mar 28 '11 at 11:29
1  
For debug output, you should use std::cerr instead of std::cout. std::cout writes to STDOUT and is buffered, so the last message you see in your terminal is not necessarily the last that was written by your program. std::cerr, on the contrary, writes to STDERR and is not buffered. –  Frank Schmitt Mar 28 '11 at 11:38
    
@Bo Persson: how can you know how much stack space you have? And can you change that? –  joris Mar 28 '11 at 11:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Probably running out of stack. Please use pointers, dynamic allocations and even better, std::vector.

#define MAX 140160
void read_inputdata(double *input, char *files);

char inputfiles1[40] = "input/Hesse04/FR_Hes_rad.txt";
std::cout << "Declaring the arrays" << std::endl;
double *input1 = new double[MAX];
std::cout << "Calling function read_inputdata" << std::endl;
read_inputdata(input1, inputfiles1);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! With using the dynamically allocation it worked. –  joris Mar 28 '11 at 11:44

My guess would be that j is exceeding the permissible range of 0..1. Try this:

        #include <assert.h>

        ...

        int j=0;
        while( result != NULL )
        {
            assert(j < 2); // make sure that we don't try to write beyond the bounds of getal !
            getal[j][i]=atof(result);
            result = strtok( NULL, delims );
            j++;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Using assert for error checking is bad! It should only be for circumstances where your application is well screwed; not logical errors. I guess it might be OK if this is used for an initial logic test and removed after... –  dcousens Mar 28 '11 at 11:44
    
@Daniel: what you say is correct, but I suggested this merely as an initial debugging step and also perhaps to introduce the idea to the OP that adding asserts is a useful and important part of programming –  Paul R Mar 28 '11 at 12:22

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