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I have a doubt. I am writing a code to load information from a file to the computer memory. But the time needed for that is very different depending on the file 'format'.

Let me explain better. In the file that I am reading I have a kind of table with random strings separated with "|". Here you have an example of table (with 5 rows and 5 columns).

Table.txt

0|42sKuG^uM|24465\lHXP|2996fQo\kN|293cvByiV
1|14772cjZ`SN|28704HxDYjzC|6869xXj\nIe|27530EymcTU
2|9041ByZM]I|24371fZKbNk|24085cLKeIW|16945TuuU\Nc
3|16542M[Uz\|13978qMdbyF|6271ait^h|13291_rBZS
4|4032aFqa|13967r^\\`T|27754k]dOTdh|24947]v_uzg

And the doubt that I have is that the time spent to load this information is very different if the table has, for example, 100.000 rows and 100 columns or if it has 100 rows and 100.000 columns (in this last case, the time is much higher). Actually the time spent to access to this information is also bigger than in the other cases.

So the doubt is, Why this time is so different if the table size is the same???

Here you have the part of the code that read this information from a file and store in the computer.

Code that reads data from the Table.txt file and store it in the computer memory

string ruta_base("C:\\a\\Table.txt"); // Folder where my "Table.txt" is found

string temp; // Variable where every row from the Table.txt file will be firstly stored
vector<string> buffer; // Variable where every different row will be stored after separating the different elements by tokens.
vector<ElementSet> RowsCols; // Variable with a class that I have created, that simulated a vector and every vector element is a row of my table (vector<string> buffer)

ifstream ifs(ruta_base.c_str());

while(getline( ifs, temp )) // We will read and store line per line until the end of the ".txt" file. 
{
    size_t tokenPosition = temp.find("|"); // When we find the simbol "|" we will identify different element. So we separate the string temp into tokens that will be stored in vector<string> buffer

    while (tokenPosition != string::npos)
    {    
        string element;
        tokenPosition = temp.find("|");      

        element = temp.substr(0, tokenPosition);
        buffer.push_back(element);
        temp.erase(0, tokenPosition+1);
    }

    ElementSet ss(0,buffer); 
    buffer.clear();
    RowsCols.push_back(ss); // We store all the elements of every row (stores as vector<string> buffer) in a different position in "RowsCols" 
}

vector<Table> TablesDescriptor;

Table TablesStorage(RowsCols);
TablesDescriptor.push_back(TablesStorage);

DataBase database(1, TablesDescriptor);

Here I add the SOLUTION that I have done with all your feedbacks

string ruta_base("C:\\a\\Table.txt"); // Folder where my "Table.txt" is found

string temp; // Variable where every row from the Table.txt file will be firstly stored
vector<string> buffer; // Variable where every different row will be stored after separating the different elements by tokens.
vector<ElementSet> RowsCols; // Variable with a class that I have created, that simulated a vector and every vector element is a row of my table

ifstream ifs(ruta_base.c_str());

while(getline( ifs, temp )) // We will read and store line per line until the end of the ".txt" file. 
{
       size_t tokenPosition = temp.find("|"); // When we find the simbol "|" we will identify different element. So we separate the string temp into tokens that will be stored in vector<string> buffer

       const char* p = temp.c_str();
      char* p1 = strdup(p);

       char* pch = strtok(p1, "|");
    while(pch)
        {
            buffer.push_back(string(pch));
            pch = strtok(NULL,"|");
        }
        free(p1);

        ElementSet sss(0,buffer);
        buffer.clear();
        RowsCols.push_back(sss);
}

vector<Table> TablesDescriptor;

Table TablesStorage(RowsCols);
TablesDescriptor.push_back(TablesStorage);

DataBase database(1, TablesDescriptor);
share|improve this question
    
im guessing the 100,000 columns & 100 rows one is faster than the 100 columns and 100,000 rows one? –  Tom Mar 28 '11 at 11:28
    
@Tom: No, its the other way round. –  Asha Mar 28 '11 at 11:35
    
Asha is right :) –  thomas Mar 28 '11 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

You don't post implementation for some of the code (e.g. ElementSet), but even in what we can see there are some operations that consume time increasing linearly with the length of the current line in the file, e.g.

temp.erase(0, tokenPosition+1);

It would be more efficient not to keep deleting bits from the start of the string - this forces the entire line of 100,000 fields to be copied constantly through memory, compacting back to the start of the string. Instead, keep track of the position that you've currently extracted from, and start the next search from that offset, also using that offset for the substr() operation. If you start thinking about things in terms of memory contents, you'll learn to analyse this kind of problem. Also use a profiler to show you which specific lines of code are slow.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I have modified my code with your feedback. Have a look and tell me if I could improve it even more. Now the time spent to load the information is smaller but the time spent to access later to the information stored in the computer memory is still slow. Actually the time to load tables with 100,000 columns & 100 rows is faster (0.325 min, much better than before) than 100,000 rows & 100 columns (1.61198 min, the same than before). But access time to some data is better in the second case (in an example 47 seconds vs. 6079 seconds in the first case) any idea why?? –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 10:39
    
I have upload the accessing code in another post not to mixt different topics. You can find it here and try to give me your help again: stackoverflow.com/questions/5479013/… Thanks a lot! :D –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 21:18

I believe the problem is in the temp.erase(0, tokenPosition+1); statement. In case the string is small (as your first case) there is not much of data to shift, but in the latter case there is too much data to shift hence its slower. I suggest you try to remove the erase and use range based find method. You can probably use the second overload given here. Use c_str() to get the const char* for the string and add the offset to it to specify your start point. Also, if you can use boost consider using Boost.Tokenizer fot tokenizing the string.

share|improve this answer
    
@Asha. Thanks a lot for your help. I have been looking at the link but I don't catch the final idea how to do it. Would it be just writing temp.find(0, tokenPosition+1); instead of temp.erase(0, tokenPosition+1);? Actually when I wrote this part of the code I didn't really understand the erase statement. Could you help me with it? Thanks in advance once more! :) –  thomas Mar 28 '11 at 13:53
    
@thomas: Sorry, the idea mentioned in the answer is wrong. I got confused with the parameters. You can see the code for splitting the string here: ideone.com/KX0lF –  Asha Mar 28 '11 at 16:07
    
@Asha. Thanks for your answer. I have modified my code with your feedback. Have a look and tell me if I could improve it even more. Now the time spent to load the information is smaller but the time spent to access later to the information stored in the computer memory is still slow. Actually the time to load tables with 100,000 columns & 100 rows is faster (0.325 min, much better than before) than 100,000 rows & 100 columns (1.61198 min, the same than before). But access time to some data is better in the second case (in an example 47 seconds vs. 6079 seconds in the first case) any idea why?? –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 10:39
    
@thomas: can you post the code on how you are accessing the data? –  Asha Mar 29 '11 at 12:11
    
@thomas: Also in case you are suspecting the stream creation is taking time (for the tokenizing), you can try using the raw strtok API. I have the same code here: ideone.com/iQav0 –  Asha Mar 29 '11 at 12:26

The string operations are a killer. You're erasing the part of the string already read; each time that happens, the string has to be reallocated and/or moved.

Keep a pointer into the string and avoid any operations that reallocate it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I have modified my code with your feedback. Have a look and tell me if I could improve it even more. Now the time spent to load the information is smaller but the time spent to access later to the information stored in the computer memory is still slow. Actually the time to load tables with 100,000 columns & 100 rows is faster (0.325 min, much better than before) than 100,000 rows & 100 columns (1.61198 min, the same than before). But access time to some data is better in the second case (in an example 47 seconds vs. 6079 seconds in the first case) any idea why?? –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 10:38
    
I have upload the accessing code in another post not to mixt different topics. You can find it here and try to give me your help again: stackoverflow.com/questions/5479013/… Thanks a lot! :D –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 21:19

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