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I am re-working some tooltip functionality on my site.

Am experimenting with the Revealing module pattern as laid out here:

http://www.addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/#designpatternsjavascript

As a quick test i tried this:

var tooltip = function(){

    var foobar = 'foo and bar';

    function getAlerter(){
        return alert(foobar);
    }

    return{
        alerter: getAlerter
    }

}();

tooltip.alerter();

Which alerts 'foo and bar' as expected.

However, i need to pass the element that triggered the tooltip functionality like so:

var tooltip = function(elem){

    var trigger = elem;

    function getAlerter(){
        return alert(trigger);
    }

    return{
        alerter: getAlerter
    }

}();

tooltip.alerter('.trigger');

But this returns undefined. Am not sure why :(

share|improve this question
    
In this and all the answers, there's a little flaw - the functions should be declared as "vars" to maintain privacy, otherwise they are revealed as globals. – Mark D Apr 8 '13 at 16:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's because you are using immediately executing function (() at the end of your 'module'), and at the moment when your function is declared and executed no value is passed.

You could tell your getAlerter function to accept additional parameter:

function getAlerter(trigger){
   // your getter code...
}

but it questions the whole idea behind your pattern. If you want to invoke your module with an element assigned, you most likely should end up with something like this:

var tooltip = function(elem){
    // your whole module code...
}('.trigger');

or, if you want multiple instances, remove the () at the end of your 'module', and run it like this:

var myTooltip = tooltip('.alerter');
myTooltip.alerter();

if you want to keep it as a single instance, you could easily add init method:

var tooltip = function(elem){

    var trigger;

    function getAlerter(){
        return alert(trigger);
    };

    function init(elem) {
        trigger = elem;
    }
    return{
        alerter: getAlerter,
        init: init
    }
}();

and run it like this:

tooltip.init('.alerter');
tooltip.alerter();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the thorough explanation. I think it has brought into question (like you said) why i want to do it this way. I think this may be overkill for my pruposes but i wanted to try it just for the sake of trying it you know :) – RyanP13 Mar 28 '11 at 12:36

Because you are returning the result of the alert not the value of trigger.

share|improve this answer
1  
not really. it's the same in the first case. – wildcard Mar 28 '11 at 11:44

This way

var tooltip = function(elem){

    function getAlerter(trigger){
        return alert(trigger);
    }

    return{
        alerter: getAlerter
    }

}();

tooltip.alerter('.trigger');
share|improve this answer

I was too hasty! @wildcard has the right idea

var tooltip = function (elem) {

    var trigger = elem;

    function getAlerter () {
        alert (trigger);
        return trigger;
    }

    return {
        alerter: getAlerter
    };
};

var q= tooltip ('.trigger');
q.alerter ();
share|improve this answer

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