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I just read in the PostgreSQL Documentation - Overview of Trigger behavior, that BEFORE triggers are "more effecient" than AFTER triggers:

If you have no specific reason to make a trigger before or after, the before case is more efficient, since the information about the operation doesn't have to be saved until end of statement.

I do not understand if this is true or what it means for me. Can someone enlighten me? Is this just a homeopatic performance improvement?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Due to PostgreSQL's MVCC architecture, each operation increases the amount of data recorded in the system, even DELETE.

So if you just need to make checks of your input and rollback the transaction if the checks fail, you better do it before the input data are saved.

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+1 This is more understandable to me. If only the error case is irrelevant, I won't care for this speed difference anymore. –  Daniel Mar 28 '11 at 15:12
    
+1 very helpful –  Jack Douglas Mar 28 '11 at 15:16
1  
DELETE doesn't increase the amount of data recorded in the system, it just doesn't release the space without a VACUUM. This is what autovacuum does, it cleans up dead tuples. –  Frank Heikens Mar 28 '11 at 16:44
    
@Frank: it does increase the WAL, that's why I wrote "system" instead of "tablespace". –  Quassnoi Mar 28 '11 at 16:48
    
@Frank I had thought Quassnoi's point was that rolling back a transaction is more efficient the earlier you do it as MVCC means until the commit, the deleted row is still visible to everyone else. Which would surely have been a very good point. –  Jack Douglas Mar 28 '11 at 18:46

For an update trigger, I found no measurable difference on my system:

with 'before' trigger:

begin;

create function f() returns trigger language plpgsql as $$
begin 
  new.time_of_day:=old.time_of_day+'1d'::interval; 
  return new; 
end;$$;

create table t(time_of_day timestamp);

insert into t(time_of_day)
select timeofday()::timestamp from generate_series(1,100000);

update t set time_of_day = timeofday()::timestamp;

select max(time_of_day)-min(time_of_day) from t;

    ?column?
-----------------
 00:00:47

create trigger trig before insert on t for each row execute procedure f();

update t set time_of_day = timeofday()::timestamp;

select max(time_of_day)-min(time_of_day) from t;

    ?column?
-----------------
 00:00:47.432173

rollback;

with 'after' trigger:

create function f() returns trigger language plpgsql as $$
begin 
  new.time_of_day:=old.time_of_day+'1d'::interval; 
  return new; 
end;$$;

create table t(time_of_day timestamp);

insert into t(time_of_day)
select timeofday()::timestamp from generate_series(1,100000);

update t set time_of_day = timeofday()::timestamp;

select max(time_of_day)-min(time_of_day) from t;

    ?column?
-----------------
 00:00:48.566558

create trigger trig after insert on t for each row execute procedure f();

update t set time_of_day = timeofday()::timestamp;

select max(time_of_day)-min(time_of_day) from t;

    ?column?
-----------------
 00:00:48.922441

But for some reason I get a very noticeable degradation with a 'before' insert trigger as compared to an 'after' insert trigger or a control

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+1 Thanks for trying it out. But don't your results really show that AFTER is slower? –  Daniel Mar 28 '11 at 15:11
    
@Daniel each test is compared against a control. The margin of difference between the (identical) controls is far higher than the difference between the control and the update with a the trigger in each case –  Jack Douglas Mar 28 '11 at 15:18

The only way you are going to prove it one way or another is to test it and see if it matters for what you are doing.

Thinking logically at the high level... if you are taking an extra step to retain more information vs not taking the extra step of course one is more work than the other. Just as walking one extra step is more work even though it may not take you a noticeable time difference. For example to walk 10 feet with 10 steps vs 11 steps.

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