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I have a PHP 5.3 script displaying users of my web site and would like to replace a certain Russian city (stored in UTF8 in PostgreSQL 8.4.7 database + CentOS 5.5/64 bits Linux) by its older name (it is an insider joke):

preg_replace('/Волгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $city);

Unfortunately this only works for exact matches: Волгоград.

This does not work for other cases, like ВОЛГОГРАД or волгоград.

If I modify my source code to

preg_replace('/[Вв]олгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $city);

then it will catch the 2nd case above.

Does anybody know what it going on and how to fix it (assuming I don't want to write [Xx] for every letter)?

Thank you! Alex

UPDATE:

# rpm -qa|grep php
php53-bcmath-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-gd-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-common-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-pdo-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-mbstring-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-xml-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-cli-5.3.3-1.el5
php53-pgsql-5.3.3-1.el5

# rpm -qa|grep pcre
pcre-6.6-2.el5_1.7
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8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I cannot reproduce your issue with a PHP 5.3.3 (PHP 5.3.3-1ubuntu9.3 with Suhosin-Patch (cli)):

$str1 = 'Волгоград';
$str2 = 'ВОЛГОГРАД';
$str3 = 'волгоград';

var_dump(preg_replace('/Волгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $str1));
var_dump(preg_replace('/Волгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $str2));
var_dump(preg_replace('/Волгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $str3));

outputs

string(20) "Сталинград"
string(20) "Сталинград"
string(20) "Сталинград"

Which PCRE version is your PHP using? Check you phpinfo() for the pcre-section. That's the one on my system:

...
pcre

PCRE (Perl Compatible Regular Expressions) Support => enabled
PCRE Library Version => 8.02 2010-03-19
...
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"PCRE Library Version 6.6 06-Feb-2006", CentOS 5.5/64 bit with: php53-bcmath-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-gd-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-common-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-pdo-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-mbstring-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-xml-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-cli-5.3.3-1.el5 php53-pgsql-5.3.3-1.el5 –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 14:15
    
Perhaps that's the problem... The PCRE version seems to be quite old. –  Stefan Gehrig Mar 28 '11 at 15:22
    
Ok, that would be the usual problem of CentOS –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 15:54

You can skip the regex, it worked for me in PHP 5.2.11 :)

$city = 'Unfortunately this only works for exact matches: Волгоград.

This does not work for other cases, like ВОЛГОГРАД or волгоград.';

echo str_ireplace('Волгоград', '[found]', $city);

Output

"Unfortunately this only works for exact matches: [found].

This does not work for other cases, like [found] or [found]."

This intrigued me, so I asked a question.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, str_ireplace('Волгоград', 'Сталинград', $city); has the same problem. –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 16:00
    
@Alexander What problem is that? Cheers. –  alex Mar 28 '11 at 23:09

I copy+pasted your big В. It is indeed U+D092, not the normal latin B. But since they look so much alike: ВB I believe the russian letter is collated onto the Latin B of U+0042.

So either it's PHP preformatting it, or maybe PCRE is somewhat inexact there too. Test your print PCRE_VERSION; and have a look into the changelog.

Anyway, to evade the problem I would suggest you only use the lowercase letters. They are more likely to be distinct from the Latin alphabet.

preg_replace('/волгоград/iu', 'Сталинград', $city);

P.S.: Evil inside joke!

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1  
I wish I got the inside joke :) –  alex Mar 28 '11 at 11:57
    
My web site embeds the old Russian card game "Preferans" and when the player with the highest bid declares "6 spades" (i.e. going to take 6 tricks with the spades as trump; is the lowest possible bid in the game), then the 2 other players aren't allowed to show their cards to each other while defending. So they are playing "in the last stand" (like the Soviet troops while defending Stalingrad city against Germans). –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 14:22
    
I'm quite sure I have the Russian "В", and not the Latin "B" in my database. The replacement does work for the Russian "Волгоград" –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 14:29
    
@Alexander: It's probably the old PCRE library. 6.6 is five years old, and even the 7.x version had some bugs like that. pcre.org/changelog.txt - Try to update that, libpcre is independent from PHP. I guess that's the source of your original problem. (Not that the database contains wrong characters.) –  mario Mar 28 '11 at 15:14

Works like a charm on my box...

<?php
    $city = 'Волгоград';
    var_dump(preg_match('/волгоград/ui', $city));
    var_dump(preg_match('/ВОЛГОГРАД/ui', $city));
    var_dump(preg_replace('/волгоград/ui', 'Сталинград', $city));
    var_dump(preg_replace('/ВОЛГОГРАД/ui', 'Сталинград', $city));

Output:

int 1
int 1
string 'Сталинград' (length=20)
string 'Сталинград' (length=20)

Are you sure that input data ($city) is in UTF8?

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This one solved the problem:

setlocale(LC_ALL, 'ru_RU.CP1251', 'rus_RUS.CP1251', 'Russian_Russia.1251');
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Just guessing, but explicitly encoding the string to unicode may help:

preg_replace('/Волгоград/iu', utf8_encode('Сталинград'), $city);
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Nope - no replacement happens at all –  Alexander Farber Mar 28 '11 at 15:57

Perhaps try: mb_eregi_replace http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.mb-eregi-replace.php

mb_eregi_replace — Replace regular expression with multibyte support ignoring case

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Actually with PHP 5.2.x on windows the selected for a solved answer did not work for me.

I had to go through converting to Windows-1251 to make it work.

Here you go the example:

$new_content = preg_replace(iconv('UTF-8', 'Windows-1251', "/\bгъз\b/i"), iconv('UTF-8', 'Windows-1251', "YYYYYY"), iconv('UTF-8', 'Windows-1251', "ти си gyz gyz гъз ГЪЗ gyzgyz гЪз gyz"));
$new_content = iconv('Windows-1251', 'UTF-8', $new_content);

The example above will substitute successfully (case-insesitively) 'гъз' with YYYYYY and give you back the UTF-8 version.

Regards!

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Note: I had a @setlocale(LC_ALL, "bg_BG.UTF-8"); –  Sasho Apr 19 '11 at 12:19

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