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I got a file with characters like these: à, è, ì, ò, ù - À. What i need to do is replace those characters with normal characters eg: à = a, è = e and so on..... This is my code so far:

StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(@"C:/JoinerOutput.csv");
string path = @"C:/Joiner.csv";
string line = File.ReadAllText(path);

if (line.Contains("à"))
{
    string asAscii = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(Encoding.Convert(Encoding.UTF8, Encoding.GetEncoding(Encoding.ASCII.EncodingName, new EncoderReplacementFallback("a"), new DecoderExceptionFallback()), Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(line)));
    Console.WriteLine(asAscii);
    Console.ReadLine();

    sw.WriteLine(asAscii);
    sw.Flush();
}

Basically this searches the file for a specific character and replaces it with another. The problem that i am having is that my if statement doesn't work. How do i go about solving this?

This is a sample of the input file:

Dimàkàtso Mokgàlo
Màmà Ràtlàdi
Koos Nèl
Pàsèkà Modisè
Jèrèmiàh Morèmi
Khèthiwè Buthèlèzi
Tiànà Pillày
Viviàn Màswàngànyè
Thirèshàn Rèddy
Wàdè Cornèlius
ènos Nètshimbupfè

This is the output if use : line = line.Replace('à', 'a'); :

Ch�rl�n� Kirst�n
M�m� R�tl�di
Koos N�l
P�s�k� Modis�
J�r�mi�h Mor�mi
Kh�thiw� Buth�l�zi
Ti�n� Pill�y
Vivi�n M�sw�ng�ny�
Thir�sh�n R�ddy
W�d� Corn�lius
�nos N�tshimbupf�

With my code the symbol will be removed completely

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In what way does the if statement not work? –  Fredrik Mörk Mar 28 '11 at 13:27
    
What do you mean by your if statements doesnt work? It cant find that specific character in the string? –  Tejs Mar 28 '11 at 13:28
    
What's so abnormal about characters like à? –  awm Mar 28 '11 at 13:28
    
The OP must be English speaking. That diacritics are essential in many languages is rather lost on us. His customer will remind him, strongly. –  Hans Passant Mar 28 '11 at 14:54
    
possible duplicate of Removing diacritics in Silverlight (String.Normalize issue) –  Hans Passant Mar 28 '11 at 14:57
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Don't know if it is useful but in an internal tool to write message on a led screen we have the following replacements (i'm sure that there are more intelligent ways to make this work for the unicode tables, but this one is enough for this small internal tool) :

        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[éèëêð]", "e");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÉÈËÊ]", "E");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[àâä]", "a");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÀÁÂÃÄÅ]", "A");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[àáâãäå]", "a");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÙÚÛÜ]", "U");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ùúûüµ]", "u");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[òóôõöø]", "o");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÒÓÔÕÖØ]", "O");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ìíîï]", "i");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÌÍÎÏ]", "I");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[š]", "s");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Š]", "S");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ñ]", "n");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Ñ]", "N");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ç]", "c");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Ç]", "C");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ÿ]", "y");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Ÿ]", "Y");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[ž]", "z");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Ž]", "Z");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Ð]", "D");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[œ]", "oe");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[Œ]", "Oe");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[«»\u201C\u201D\u201E\u201F\u2033\u2036]", "\"");
        strMessage = Regex.Replace(strMessage, "[\u2026]", "...");

One thing to note is that if in most language the text is still understandable after such a treatment it's not always the case and will often force the reader to refer to the context of the sentence to be able to understand it. Not something you want if you have the choice.


Note that the correct solution would be to use the unicode tables, replacing characters with integrated diacritics with their "combined diacritical mark(s)"+character form and then removing the diacritics...

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It really seems like there should be a better way, but it looks like there isn't using built in methods in C#, so I'm going to favourite this question in case I need to steal this answer at some point. :-) –  Iain Collins Mar 28 '11 at 13:42
    
The correct solution would be to use the unicode tables, replacing characters with integrated diacritics with their diacritics+character form and then removing the diacritics... But well I never had the need to do it in production code for now so i'll also favourite this question in case someone does the complex work :-) –  VirtualBlackFox Mar 28 '11 at 13:54
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Others have commented on using a Unicode lookup table to remove Diacritics. I did a quick Google search and found this example. Code shamelessly copied, (re-formatted), and posted below:

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

public static class Remove
{
    public static string RemoveDiacritics(string stIn)
    {
        string stFormD = stIn.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        for(int ich = 0; ich < stFormD.Length; ich++) {
            UnicodeCategory uc = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(stFormD[ich]);
            if(uc != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark) {
                sb.Append(stFormD[ich]);
            }
        }

        return(sb.ToString().Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC));
    }
}

So, your code could clean the input by calling:

line = Remove.RemoveDiacritics(line);
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I often use an extenstion method based on the version Dana supplied. A quick explanation:

  • Normalizing to form D splits charactes like è to an e and a nonspacing `
  • From this, the nospacing characters are removed
  • The result is normalized back to form D (I'm not sure if this is neccesary)

Code:

using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

// namespace here
public static class Utility
{
    public static string RemoveDiacritics(this string str)
    {
        if (str == null) return null;
        var chars =
            from c in str.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD).ToCharArray()
            let uc = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c)
            where uc != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark
            select c;

        var cleanStr = new string(chars.ToArray()).Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC);

        return cleanStr;
    }
}
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Why are you making things complicated?

line = line.Replace('à', 'a');

Update:

The docs for File.ReadAllText say:

This method attempts to automatically detect the encoding of a file based on the presence of byte order marks. Encoding formats UTF-8 and UTF-32 (both big-endian and little-endian) can be detected.

Use the ReadAllText(String, Encoding) method overload when reading files that might contain imported text, because unrecognized characters may not be read correctly.

What encoding is C:/Joiner.csv in? Maybe you should use the other overload for File.ReadAllText where you specify the input encoding yourself?

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I would have answered the same way, but I think he's trying to avoid a giant set of replacement lines for every possible character he doesnt want. =D –  Tejs Mar 28 '11 at 13:29
1  
@Tejs: The posted code is certainly no better than this suggestion in that respect. There's both a plain and an accented a in there. –  Jon Mar 28 '11 at 13:32
    
if i use that code this is a sample of what the output is Thir�sh�n R�ddy –  Trishen Mar 28 '11 at 13:43
    
@Trishen: Edit your answer and post all relevant code so we can see the outpout of what that is. –  Jon Mar 28 '11 at 13:48
    
ive edited the question as asked, have a look and tell me what you think –  Trishen Mar 28 '11 at 17:07
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Use this:

     if (line.Contains(“OldChar”))
     {
        line = line.Replace(“OldChar”, “NewChar”);
     }
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Sounds like what you want to do is convert Extended ASCII (eight-bit) to ASCII (seven-bit) - so searching for that might help.

I've seen libraries to handle this in other languages but have never had to do it in C#, this looks like it might be somewhat enlightening though:

Convert two ascii characters to their 'corresponding' one character extended ascii representation

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