Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created an XML template in ERB. I fill it in with data from a database during an export process.

In some cases, there is a null value, in which case an element may be empty, like this:

<someitem>

</someitem>

In that case, the client receiving the export wants it to be converted into a self-closing tag:

<someitem/>

I'm trying to see how to get Nokogiri to do this, but I don't see it yet. Does anybody know how to make empty XML tags self-closing with Nokogiri?

Update

A regex was sufficient to do what I specified above, but the client now also wants tags whose children are all empty to be self-closing. So this:

<someitem>
  <subitem>

  </subitem>
  <subitem>

  </subitem>
</someitem>

... should also be

<someitem/>

I think that this will require using Nokogiri.

share|improve this question
    
I do not understand your updated self-closing rule. It seems that you're suggesting that nodes with no content (subitem) should be removed. If this is the case, though, then after removing them the parent (someitem) should also be removed, as it too will have no content. –  Phrogz Mar 30 '11 at 15:19
add comment

2 Answers

Search for

<([^>]+)>\s*</\1>

and replace with

<\1/>

In Ruby:

result = subject.gsub(/<([^>]+)>\s*<\/\1>/, '<\1/>')

Explanation:

<       # Match opening bracket
(       # Match and remember...
 [^>]+  # One or more characters except >
)       # End of capturing group
>       # Match closing bracket
\s*     # Match optional whitespace & newlines
<       # Match opening bracket
/       # Match /
\1      # Match the contents of the opening tag
>       # Match closing bracket
share|improve this answer
    
This is the easiest thing for me to drop in conditionally in the export process. Thanks! –  Nathan Long Mar 28 '11 at 14:17
    
@MattHuggins: Your edit doesn't make much sense. \n is already contained in \s, so [\s\n] is exactly the same as \s. But the previous edit already was strange (for kind of the same reasons), so I think the answer should be reverted to its original form. What do you think? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 3 '13 at 15:11
    
@TimPietzcker - I didn't realize that \n is already included \s. The first edit is what inspired my second edit. If what you say is true, then I agree reverting to the original answer is probably for the best. (It might be worth updating the explanation for \s* to make it clear that this includes whitespace & newlines.) –  Matt Huggins Apr 3 '13 at 15:13
1  
I've gone ahead & reverted with a note that \s includes newlines. :) Thanks for clearing that up! –  Matt Huggins Apr 3 '13 at 15:42
add comment

A couple questions:

  1. <foo></foo> is the same as <foo />, so why worry about such a tiny detail? If it is syntactically significant because the text node between the two is a "\n", then put a test in your ERB template that checks for the value that would go there, and if it's not initialized output the self-closing tag instead? See "Yak shaving".
  2. Why involve Nokogiri? You should be able to generate correct XML in ERB since you're in control of the template.

EDIT - Nokogiri's behavior is to not-rewrite parsed XML unless it has to. I suspect you'd have to remove the node in question, then reinsert it as an empty node to get Nokogiri to output what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I heartily agree with your first point. It's the client who receives the export who has asked for this change. –  Nathan Long Mar 28 '11 at 13:58
    
Then just do it in ERB. A second pass through Nokogiri is a lot of extra processing without a lot of added benefit. –  the Tin Man Mar 28 '11 at 13:59
    
You make a good point, but since this is kind of a "yak-shaving" request, and I don't think other clients will care, I am trying to do it conditionally in the export task for this client. The conditional logic would be easier to put in one place there than in multiple places in the template. And the processing overhead isn't a big deal, since this code will be run something like once a month, and if it takes 30 seconds or 10 minutes, I don't really care. –  Nathan Long Mar 28 '11 at 14:03
    
When I have a conditional string I need to output multiple times in ERB, I either predefine it in my controller, or, I'll create it at the top of the template and assign it to a variable, then reference the variable throughout the document. For example, things like paging in reports where its the same thing at the top and bottom. –  the Tin Man Mar 28 '11 at 14:08
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.