Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For the following code snippet I get the output as 1. I want to know how it came?

void main()
{
int x=10,y=20,z=5,i;
i=x<y<z;
printf("%d",i);
}
share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

i=x<y<z;, gets interpreted as i=(x<y)<z, which in turn gets interpreted as i=1<z, which evaluates to 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems to be a rather common mistake, at least GCC (probably other compilers, too) prints out a warning, if warnings are enabled: warning: comparisons like 'X<=Y<=Z' do not have their mathematical meaning –  Saytonurn Mar 28 '11 at 17:06
add comment

10 is less than 20, resulting in 1, and 1 is less than 5, resulting in 1. C doesn't chain relational operators as some other languages do.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is because your code evaluates as:

void main()
{
    int x=10,y=20,z=5,i;
    i=((x<y)<z); //(x<y) = true = 1, (1 < 5) = true
    printf("%d",i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How can you change the code and talk about evaluation? –  al-Khwārizmī Mar 28 '11 at 13:56
    
I set braces for illustrate how compiler interpreted code –  Eugene Burtsev Mar 28 '11 at 14:01
add comment

what output did you want?

In C,

i = 2 < 3; //i == 1.
i = 4 < 3; //i == 0.

If condition evaluates to false, value returned is 0, and 1 otherwise.
Also, x < y < z will be evaluated as ((x < y) < z).

share|improve this answer
add comment
x<y // 1 as (10 < 20) will return 1
result of(x<y)<z // 1 as (1<5) will return 1 
share|improve this answer
add comment

Check this very very similar Example

share|improve this answer
add comment

It operates as follows: Since < is a logical expression, x<y i.e 10<20 is true i.e 1. So it becomes 1<z i.e 1<5 which is again true i.e. 1 which is assigned to i. So i is 1.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.