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I'm writing a section of code to read in CSV files and parse information out of them (currently I just have the beginning part of the code which will read in the headers at the beginning of the file. When I try to compile this code I'm receiving an error on the line which takes the length of the line from file.

The error I'm recieving is: [Error] MCLRandomizer.pas(*): Missing operator or semicolon

while not EOF(csvFile) do begin
        i :=0;
        ReadLn(csvFile, line);
        if lineOne = true then begin
          length := Length(line);               //error here
          while length > 0 do begin
            dx := Pos(',', line);
            buffer := Copy(line, 0, dx-1);
            headers[i] := buffer;
            line := Copy(line, dx+1, length);   
            length := Length(line);             //error here
          end;
          lineOne := false;
        end;
      end;
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What kind of error and how does the declaration of "length" and "line" look like? –  Nodebody Mar 28 '11 at 13:55
    
Is there any chance you'll receive quoted fields or escaped commas in your csv file? If so, the above approach wont work. You're generally better off iterating every character using a TFileStream. –  GrandmasterB Mar 28 '11 at 19:27
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4 Answers

Pascal makes no difference between length and Length ... they both are LENGTH

Rename the variable, it messes up the function.

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2  
Delphi is case-insensitive. This is one of its weak points. –  David Heffernan Mar 28 '11 at 13:55
8  
I don't agree that it is a weak point. I find it much easier to read code, less error prone, etc. –  Linas Mar 28 '11 at 14:05
6  
Weak points? I consider case-sensitivity to be one of the weakest points of C/C++/Java/etc. Why should "myvar" be different from "Myvar" and "myVar"? –  Graham Mar 28 '11 at 14:06
3  
@David: Yes, it most certainly is case-insensitive. But I am not quite sure I'd call that "one of its weak points". After all, surely it wouldn't be a good idea to have a function named Length and a variable named length in the same block of code, even if that would work, technically? Still I do find strange capitalization ugly, e.g. BEGIN and Begin instead of begin. Thus, if the language enforced standard capitalization, code would probably look better on average because everyone would write it the same way. –  Andreas Rejbrand Mar 28 '11 at 14:07
2  
@Graham Case is important. Every decent programmer uses it. Every decent Pascal programmer writes MyVar every time and doesn't occasionaly use myvar. Anything that is significant in the mind of the programmer should also be significant to the compiler. That's why I prefer Python significant indentation over other block delimiters. –  David Heffernan Mar 28 '11 at 14:10
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FTR: If you really, really want you can write

length := System.Length(line);

(assuming length is an Integer). I agree with the other posters that that would be a bad idea.

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A solution I developed to read a csv file into a record structure (actually an array of records structures) is

program read_file_into_array_of_records;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, StrUtils;



type
    Tscore = record
                name : string [25];
                marks : integer;
              end;

var
    input_file: TextFile;
    file_record : string[100];
    score : array [0..3] of Tscore;
    index : integer;



// function that returns all text up to a comma or the end of the line
function get_value() : string;
var
    comma_pos: integer;
    value: string[100];
begin


    comma_pos := Pos(',', file_record);

    // if comma found cut out all text up to it
    if comma_pos <> 0 then
    begin


        value := leftstr(file_record, comma_pos - 1);


        delete(file_record, 1, comma_pos);
    end
    else
    begin

        // no comma found so just take everything that remains
        value := file_record;
    end;

    get_value := value;


end;


// procedure to fill one record by breaking up the comma separated values
procedure fill_record (index: integer);
begin

    // call the function get_value as many times as needed to get
    // each comma separated value
    score[index].name := get_value();
    score[index].marks := strtoint(get_value());
end;


// procedure to fill array with contents of csv file
procedure fill_array ();
begin


    index := 0;



    while not EoF(input_file) do
    begin


        readln(input_file, file_record);


        fill_record (index);


        index := index + 1;
    end;


end;


// procedure to display contents of array
procedure display_array ();
begin



    for index := 0 to 3 do
    begin


        writeln(score[index].name, ' got ', score[index].marks, ' marks' );
    end;

    readln;

end;


// main prog

begin

    assignfile(input_file, 'scores.csv');

    reset(input_file);

    fill_array ();

    closefile(input_file);

    display_array();

end.

the contents of scores.csv:

james,31
jane,23
toby,34
ruth,40

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Moreover, Pascal strings at 1, not 0. (copy() statement)

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