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I have a method similar to this

public void method(final Object A){ .... }

now I want to write a test which ensures Object A is always final. How do I write such test ?

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I'm not sure what you're asking... it is final; it is marked as such. Are you wanting to test that its value never changes during the execution of method? –  andersoj Mar 28 '11 at 15:20
    
basically I don't want the Object A to be changed within this Method. So I want to prevent other developers to come and change the 'final' type of the Object. I want a unit test to guard against such shenanigans. –  arpanoid Mar 28 '11 at 16:10
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm afraid you do not understand what your method does. A final parameter in a method means only that the parameter cannot be reassigned in the method.

 public void doStuff( String s ){
     s = "OK";
 }

but

 public void doStuff( final String s ){
     s = "ERROR s cannot be assigned because it is final!";//causes error
 }

As such, there is no behaviour that can test for. If it is not valid it will not compile.


Edit: If you want you unit test for a final I don't that is possible either since I believe that information is lost at time of compilation once it is checked internally.

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I think it's a perfectly good question - is it possible to unit-test the presence of a final method parameter? –  skaffman Mar 28 '11 at 15:30
    
@skaffman I think not since I believe "final" is essentially a compile-time annotation –  ArtB Mar 28 '11 at 15:58
    
Well, I don't have anymore time to spend on this so this is just a pointer not an answer. What you want to do is use reflection to get the parameters for a method (couldn't see how to do this) and check it's modifiers to see if it's final. download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/reflect/… –  Speck Mar 28 '11 at 16:01
    
@user381091 Those are modifiers for class members (aka fields) and methods but not for method parameters. You will notice that method parameters also cannot be static, abstract, volatile, transient, etc. If this was an actual runtime annotaiton you could use Method.getParameterAnnotations() . –  ArtB Mar 28 '11 at 16:04
    
basically I don't want the Object A to be changed within this Method. So I want to prevent other developers to come and change the 'final' type of the Object. I want a unit test to guard against such shenanigans –  arpanoid Mar 28 '11 at 16:11
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