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I am using the following code in order to reverse a char array. My code as well as the error can be found below.

My code:

char * reverseStr(char* s) {
int i=0; //legnth of string
while(s[i]) i++;
char reversed[i];
for(int j=0; j<i; j++) {
    reversed[j] = s[i-j - 1]; //look at this later
}
return *(reversed);
}

The error:

        Compiling...
Compile error: your program did not compile correctly:
program.c: In function 'char* reverseStr(char*)':
program.c:18: error: invalid conversion from 'char' to 'char*'
      --> 17:   }
      --> 18:   return *(reversed);

Thank you in advance!

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Looking like an issue with const types. possibility.com/Cpp/const.html –  Joe Mar 28 '11 at 15:19
1  
put the complete code i think the error is in another part of your code –  ahmedsafan86 Mar 28 '11 at 15:21
1  
Why are you returning a character instead of the pointer to char of the reversed string? –  al-Acme Mar 28 '11 at 15:22
    
another thing you can't create an array of variable type it must be fixed you can use new operator instead char* reversed=new char[i]; the array length must be known at the compiling time –  ahmedsafan86 Mar 28 '11 at 15:22
    
You've posted the wrong part of the code - the error is in or around line 45, probably in the call to strcpy. –  Paul R Mar 28 '11 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your code i is not const.

char reverseStr(char* s) {
int i=0; // --->> NOT CONST
while(s[i]) i++;
char reversed[i];
for(int j=0; j<i; j++) {
    reversed[j] = s[i-j - 1]; //look at this later
}
return *(reversed);
}

char reversed[i]; ---> Variable Length Array in C++?? i is supposed to be known at Compile time.

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Your return value and type is wrong.

Furthermore, your declaration of reversed is invalid and would leak memory in any case.

Also, calculating the string length instead of using std::strlen isn’t recommended and the standard library has the std::reverse function to reverse strings.

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: I think rather than causing a memory leak, the declaration char reversed[i];should cause an error and not compile, since i is not const. VLAs are not supported by C++ AFAIK. –  al-Acme Mar 28 '11 at 15:49
    
@Acme that’s what I meant by “is invalid”. But even with VLA support and a fixed return statement this function would leak an invalid pointer. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 28 '11 at 15:54
    
Ok...got it..... –  al-Acme Mar 28 '11 at 16:01

Well, you are returning a char instead of a char*, so you are only returning the first letter in the reversed string instead of a string. Which causes your error messages, because you try to treat a char as a char*.

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The reversed array is allocated inside the function, so returning a pointer to it would be a bad idea anyway. –  David Thornley Mar 28 '11 at 15:23
    
True, he needs to allocate that array with new. –  Skyler Saleh Mar 28 '11 at 15:27

Check the error message:

program.c: In function 'int itoa2(int, char*, int)':
program.c:45: error: invalid conversion from 'char' to 'const char*'

It clearly tells you what the error is: invalid cast from const char* to char

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strcpy receives (char*, const char*) as parameters.However, the return type of your function is char, thus the error appears.
And char reversed[] is allocated on the stack of the function, please don't use it as a return value.

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