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Using reflection, I'm attempting to find the set of types which inherit from a given base class. It didn't take long to figure out for simple types, but I'm stumped when it comes to generics.

For this piece of code, the first IsAssignableFrom returns true, but the second returns false. And yet, the final assignment compiles just fine.

class class1 { }
class class2 : class1 { }
class generic1<T> { }
class generic2<T> : generic1<T> { }

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Type c1 = typeof(class1);
        Type c2 = typeof(class2);
        Console.WriteLine("c1.IsAssignableFrom(c2): {0}", c1.IsAssignableFrom(c2));

        Type g1 = typeof(generic1<>);
        Type g2 = typeof(generic2<>);
        Console.WriteLine("g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2): {0}", g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2));

        generic1<class1> cc = new generic2<class1>();
    }
}

So how do I determine at run time whether one generic type definition is derived from another?

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2  
The final assignment only involves generic2... –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 28 '11 at 15:33
    
possible duplicate of How To Detect If Type is Another Generic Type –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 28 '11 at 15:35
    
@Daniel Hilgarth - Thanks! I missed that when I was cleaning up the sample code before posting. It still compiles when the assignment is generic1<class1> cc = new generic2<class1>(); –  ThatBlairGuy Mar 28 '11 at 15:37
    
Sure it compiles ;-) The problem is, that generic1<> is not assignable to generic2<> in general, and that's what you are asking, when you omit the generic parameter in the call to typeof. It is only assignable, if the generic parameter is the same for generic1 and generic2. How to solve that? See Konrad Rudolph's answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 28 '11 at 15:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

From the answer to another question:

public static bool IsAssignableToGenericType(Type givenType, Type genericType)
{
    var interfaceTypes = givenType.GetInterfaces();

    foreach (var it in interfaceTypes)
    {
        if (it.IsGenericType && it.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericType)
            return true;
    }

    if (givenType.IsGenericType && givenType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericType)
        return true;

    Type baseType = givenType.BaseType;
    if (baseType == null) return false;

    return IsAssignableToGenericType(baseType, genericType);
}

(If you like the answer please upvote the linked answer since the code isn’t mine.)

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Thanks! This does exactly what I was looking for. I hadn't noticed that other question when I looking earlier. –  ThatBlairGuy Mar 28 '11 at 18:32
1  
In the following case, this method could be wrong: IsAssignableToGenericType(typeof(A<string>), typeof(A<>));// return false –  sam sha Sep 23 '11 at 14:49
    
However this answer is great, be ware when you're using this though. I used it, made the bool expression work and then I couldn't do anything because I could cast my object in order to use it... I had to introduce an interface which I could simply check for with is... –  Jaap May 23 '12 at 19:32
1  
Based on this method I created a different method that fetches the generic arguments used for the base type: gist.github.com/2936304 –  Jaap Jun 15 '12 at 12:46

The exact code you posted does not return surprising results.

This says "false":

Type g1 = typeof(generic1<>);
Type g2 = typeof(generic2<>);
Console.WriteLine("g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2): {0}", g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2));

This says "true":

Type g1 = typeof(generic1<class1>);
Type g2 = typeof(generic2<class1>);
Console.WriteLine("g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2): {0}", g1.IsAssignableFrom(g2));

The difference is that open generic types cannot have instances, so one is not "assignable" to the other.

From the docs:

Returns true if c and the current Type represent the same type, or if the current Type is in the inheritance hierarchy of c, or if the current Type is an interface that c implements, or if c is a generic type parameter and the current Type represents one of the constraints of c. false if none of these conditions are true, or if c is null.

In this case, clearly none of these conditions are true. And there's an extra note:

A generic type definition is not assignable from a closed constructed type. That is, you cannot assign the closed constructed type MyGenericList (MyGenericList(Of Integer) in Visual Basic) to a variable of type MyGenericList.

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In the following case use the method Konrad Rudolph provided could be wrong, like: IsAssignableToGenericType(typeof(A), typeof(A<>));// return false

I think here's a better answer

public static bool IsAssignableFrom(Type extendType, Type baseType)
{
    while (!baseType.IsAssignableFrom(extendType))
    {
        if (extendType.Equals(typeof(object)))
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (extendType.IsGenericType && !extendType.IsGenericTypeDefinition)
        {
            extendType = extendType.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
        }
        else
        {
            extendType = extendType.BaseType;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

the test case, see Using IsAssignableFrom with C# generics for detail

using System;

/**
 * Sam Sha - yCoder.com
 *
 * */
namespace Test2
{
    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main (string[] args)
        {
            string a = "ycoder";
            Console.WriteLine(a is object);
            A aa = new A();
            //Console.WriteLine(aa is A<>);//con't write code like this
            typeof(A<>).IsAssignableFrom(aa.GetType());//return false

            Trace(typeof(object).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(string)));//true
            Trace(typeof(A<>).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(A)));//false

            AAA aaa = new AAA();
            Trace("Use IsTypeOf:");
            Trace(IsTypeOf(aaa, typeof(A<>)));
            Trace(IsTypeOf(aaa, typeof(AA)));
            Trace(IsTypeOf(aaa, typeof(AAA<>)));

            Trace("Use IsAssignableFrom from stackoverflow - not right:");
            Trace(IsAssignableFrom(typeof(A), typeof(A<>))); // error
            Trace(IsAssignableFrom(typeof(AA), typeof(A<>)));
            Trace(IsAssignableFrom(typeof(AAA), typeof(A<>)));

            Trace("Use IsAssignableToGenericType:");
            Trace(IsAssignableToGenericType(typeof(A), typeof(A<>)));
            Trace(IsAssignableToGenericType(typeof(AA), typeof(A<>)));
            Trace(IsAssignableToGenericType(typeof(AAA), typeof(A<>)));
        }

        static void Trace(object log){
                Console.WriteLine(log);
        }

        public static bool IsTypeOf(Object o, Type baseType)
        {
            if (o == null || baseType == null)
            {
                return false;
            }
            bool result = baseType.IsInstanceOfType(o);
            if (result)
            {
                return result;
            }
            return IsAssignableFrom(o.GetType(), baseType);
        }

        public static bool IsAssignableFrom(Type extendType, Type baseType)
        {
            while (!baseType.IsAssignableFrom(extendType))
            {
                if (extendType.Equals(typeof(object)))
                {
                    return false;
                }
                if (extendType.IsGenericType && !extendType.IsGenericTypeDefinition)
                {
                    extendType = extendType.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
                }
                else
                {
                    extendType = extendType.BaseType;
                }
            }
            return true;
        }

        //from stackoverflow - not good enough
        public static bool IsAssignableToGenericType(Type givenType, Type genericType) {
            var interfaceTypes = givenType.GetInterfaces();

            foreach (var it in interfaceTypes)
                if (it.IsGenericType)
                    if (it.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericType) return true;

            Type baseType = givenType.BaseType;
            if (baseType == null) return false;

            return baseType.IsGenericType &&
                baseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericType ||
                IsAssignableToGenericType(baseType, genericType);
        }
    }

    class A{}
    class AA : A{}
    class AAA : AA{}
}
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1  
Note: This answer does not handle generic interfaces. –  phloopy Aug 14 '13 at 20:19

You need to compare the contained type. See: C# generic list <T> how to get the type of T?

In other words, I think you need to check whether the type being contained by the generic class is assignable rather than the generic class itself.

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