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This is an interview question, can be wrong :-)

How will you execute Three threads sequentially. For eg. Thread1, Thread2, Thread3. It is not possible to pass the reference of one Thread to the other and invoke from the run() method.

So code should be like this:

 Thread1.start();
 Thread2.start();
 Thread3.start();

and out put should be

 Printing Thread1
 Printing Thread2
 Printing Thread3

This can be possible by using ThreadPoolExecutor and using a blocking queue but even that is not an acceptable answer.

Thanks in advance.

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please write some details about if you are able to modify the threads' bodies. –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 16:15
    
@xappy: You are free to implement a solution but I doubt he was expecting passing thread references or using wait()/notify(). I was made to feel there was a obvious solution that I didn't know. –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:24
    
but.. At the same time on the contrary they could expect that you provide them exactly solution with wait()/notify() (or another synchronization mechanism). It will show that you do really understand how to synchronize threads. In our multicore age it is very important to understand synchronization issues and such knowledge is appreciated not less than just smartness. –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 16:28

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use ExecutorService in java.util.concurrent package. More precisely use Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

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You could use Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor(), but strictly speaking this launches only one Thread, so may not be expected solution.

The simpliest solution using just Thread class:

Thread1.start();
Thread1.join();
Thread2.start();
Thread2.join();
Thread3.start();
Thread3.join();

(I omitted exception handling for clarity, Thread.join() can throw InterruptedException)

share|improve this answer
    
But OP needs that all three threads were launched in row without any code between start()s . –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 16:05
    
I disagree. The question is a little ambigious, but I think I got it the right way. If they are started in a row then you would have to modify run() method to synchronize them somehow and I think this interview question was not about it. –  pajton Mar 28 '11 at 16:09
    
I don't know what does Geek's interviewer wants, but I just see three sequential calls of start() method and the needed output. –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 16:16
    
This looks ok. May be an acceptable answer :-) –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:29

The simplest answer is

Thread1.run();
Thread2.run();
Thread3.run();

The problem with unrealistic questions is they often have an uninformative answer. ;)

The whole point of having threads is to run them concurrently. If you are not doing that at all, don't use threads.

You might say that; you cannot call the run() method, in which case you cannot use ThreadPoolExecutor because it calls the run() method for you. i.e. thats what submit() eventually does.

EDIT: The results are completely deterministic, becaus ethe fact that there is a Thread involved is irrelivent.

static class PrintThread extends Thread {
    public PrintThread(String name) {
        super(name);
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            System.out.println(getName() + ": " + i);
    }
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    Thread thread1 = new PrintThread("A");
    Thread thread2 = new PrintThread("B");
    Thread thread3 = new PrintThread("C");

    thread1.run();
    thread2.run();
    thread3.run();
}

Prints

A: 0
A: 1
.. deleted ..
C: 98
C: 99

as expected.

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1  
Well, but the result of this code will not be as expected on any multicore machine:) –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 15:50
1  
It will give the result the OP requested on a single or mult-core machine. :P –  Peter Lawrey Mar 28 '11 at 15:51
    
It is also not the truth. If threads had to print more than one line (for example, print 100 strings in loop) then result is unpredictable. Even on a single core machine. –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 15:53
1  
I like the answer. I think it is the right answer to the wrong question :-) –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 15:56
5  
@xappy: You're just wrong. run doesn't run as a new thread, it runs the thread's logic from the invoking thread. Maybe you're confusing run() with start()? They will be run sequentially, however it doesn't execute the three threads per se so I'm not sure it exactly answers the question. –  Mark Peters Mar 28 '11 at 15:58

Since this is an interview question, they're looking for specific knowledge, not a "well it's obviously better to do it this way" answer. It also seems that they'll likely strike out solution after solution until they get the answer they want.

Odds are they want to see if you can implement inter-thread communications yourself. But they don't want you to do it the easy way (thread references available). Otherwise, you could just do thread.join().

So have all three threads grab some bit of shared memory (synchronized static class). Have each thread check a public static int nextThread(). Upon successful comparison that they are the next thread, they should do their work and update public static setNextThread(int value) with the value of the next thread to be processed.

The key is to do this in a thread-safe manner; however, if you can guarantee unique thread identifiers and ensure that no two threads have the same identifier, you can (with careful coding) even manage to do this without synchronization.

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+1. I upvote your answer. –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:31

If it were not related to various ways of invoking these threads, theoretically, they should use acquire a common sempahore, and release it when done printing.
JDK has an inbuilt semaphore.

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good to see the question boiling down to a semaphore –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:27
1  
This makes sure they don't run in parallel, but that doesn't mean they run sequentially (i.e. Thread 2 could run before Thread 1) if it were the threads themselves that acquire the semaphore. –  Mark Peters Mar 28 '11 at 18:02
    
+1, @Mark, true. To solve this, the semaphore can be made fair download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… –  CMR Mar 28 '11 at 18:11

Threads can be executed sequentially by using ExecutorService. Find below example.

public class SeqThread {

public static void main(String[] arg) {
      new SeqThread().execute();
}

public void execute() {
    try {
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
    executor.submit(R);
    executor.submit(R2);
    executor.shutdown();

        executor.awaitTermination(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Runnable R = new Runnable() {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
        {
            System.out.println("In Thread One "+i);
            try {
                Thread.sleep(500);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
};

Runnable R2 = new Runnable() {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
        {
            System.out.println("In Thread Two="+i);
            try {
                Thread.sleep(500);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
};

}

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You can find everything there: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/index.html

Especially read about notifications and synchronization between threads.

P.S. And remember, even if you pass the interview you'll still had to work! :)

(Ok, I'll give some hints: look the description of such methods as Object.wait() and Object.notifyAll() it is the simpliest but also very usefull mechanism)

share|improve this answer
    
You'd be crazy to use wait/notify for such a simple problem. Not to mention the fact that you'd have to rewrite your thread logic to use it. –  Mark Peters Mar 28 '11 at 16:00
    
@xap: that will work with some clever or say bad boolean flags, I understand wait(), notify(). Idoubt the interviewer was looking for that. :-) –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:01
    
@Mark : "You'd be crazy" is not appropriate. We are just discussing a question. Hang on, some one might give a clever hack. –  Geek Mar 28 '11 at 16:03
    
@Mark, I just answered the question how to run 3 different threads so they executed their code sequentially. And I think this mechanism is the simpliest one (boolean flags are not thread safe). –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 16:13
1  
@Mark, if you don't mind, I'll provide my answer by words. Here is two "lock objects" and three threads. The second thread just waits at the beginning of the execution on the first "lock" and the third thread - on the second "lock". The first thread executes its code and notifies all threads using the first lock. Then, the second thread at the end of its execution notifies all waiters on the second lock. That is. –  xappymah Mar 28 '11 at 18:10

newSingleThreadExecutor. A single-threaded executor creates a single worker thread to process tasks, replacing it if it dies unexpectedly. Tasks are guaranteed to be processed sequentially according to the order imposed by the task queue (FIFO, LIFO, priority order).

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This could be a trick question. Maybe they don't want to hear the solution to this specific problem but want you to back track to the source of the problem and come up with a better solution.

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public static void main(String[] args)throws InterruptedException {

    MyRunnable r = new MyRunnable();
    Thread t1 = new Thread(r,"A");
    Thread t2 = new Thread(r,"B");
    Thread t3 = new Thread(r,"C");
    t1.start();
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    t2.start();
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    t3.start();



}
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