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How to I dispose the File.OpenRead() correctly. I am currently using the below code?

using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(File.OpenRead(path)))
{
   myByte = br.ReadByte();
}

I get the following in Visual Studio when analyzing the code:

Warning 1 CA2000 : Microsoft.Reliability : In method 'Program.Main(string[])', object 'File.OpenRead(path)' is not disposed along all exception paths. Call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object 'File.OpenRead(path)' before all references to it are out of scope.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

At first glance, this looks like a false positive, because disposing the BinaryReader will also dispose the FileStream returned by File.OpenRead:

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azy2k2bx.aspx

When the disposing parameter is true, this method releases all resources held by any managed objects that this BinaryReader references. This method invokes the Dispose method of each referenced object.

However, there is one corner case, where the FileStream is really not disposed: When the constructor of BinaryReader throws an exception!

Solution:
The correct way to write your code would be like this:

using (var fs = File.OpenRead(path))
{
    BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs);
    myByte = br.ReadByte();
}

Background:
BinaryReader only holds a reference to the FileStream and therefore doesn't need to be disposed.
Code Analysis shares this opinion.


BTW: When using this solution for a writable stream, it is important to flush the writer before the stream is disposed:

using (var fileStream = new FileStream(...))
{
    var writer = new StreamWriter(fileStream);

    writer.WriteLine(...);

    writer.Flush(); // <-- Important
}

If you forget this, your stream might not contain everything that has been written using the StreamWriter.

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1  
+1, good point. The examples in the documentation read like the code in the question: the result of File.Open isn't explicitly disposed. –  John M Gant Mar 28 '11 at 16:46
    
Yes, this is what I like to think too. –  GuruMeditation Mar 28 '11 at 16:52
    
Yep, that code works without it complaining. Thanks. –  GuruMeditation Mar 28 '11 at 17:07
    
At last! A way that Microsoft seems to like! I was suppressing the code analysis messages before, but couldn't help feeling...dirty. –  Mike Loux Jan 3 '13 at 19:03

Hows about:

using (Filestream fs = File.OpenRead(Path))
{
    using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs))
    {
        myByte = br.ReadByte();
    }
}
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2  
Simple, straightforward, the way everything should be. You could even ditch all the outer set of brackets for brevity (but that's subjective). –  RQDQ Mar 28 '11 at 16:45
1  
That returns another warning: Warning 1 CA2202 : Microsoft.Usage : Object 'fs' can be disposed more than once in method 'Program.Main(string[])'. To avoid generating a System.ObjectDisposedException you should not call Dispose more than one time on an object.: Lines: 24 –  GuruMeditation Mar 28 '11 at 16:50
    
lol No matter how you do it, you always get a warning x-D –  codymanix Mar 28 '11 at 16:56

File.OpenRead returns a FileStream, which is also IDisposible. You can put it in an outer using block if you like, or declare it and dispose it outside your current using.

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Both the FileStream that's created by File.OpenRead and the BinaryReader that you create on that FileStream need to be disposed of, so you need an explicit reference to each:

using(FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(path))
using(BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs))
{
   myByte = br.ReadByte();
}
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