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I had an issue recently (see my last question) that led me to take a closer look at the memory management in my Delphi application. After my first exploration, I have two questions.

I've started playing with the FastMMUsageTracker, and noticed the following. When I open a file to be used by the app (which also creates a form etc...), there is a significant discrepancy between the variation in available virtual memory for the app, and the variation in "FastMM4 allocated" memory.

First off, I'm a little confused by the terminology: why is there some FastMM-allocated memory and some "System-allocated" (and reserved) memory? Since FastMM is the memory manager, why is the system in charge of allocating some of the memory?

Also, how can I get more details on what objects/structures have been allocated that memory? The VM chart is only useful in showing the amount of memory that is "system allocated", "system reserved", or "FastMM allocated", but there is no link to the actual objects requiring that memory. Is it possible for example to get a report, mid-execution, similar to what FastMM generates upon closing the application? FastMM obviously stores that information somewhere.


As a bonus for me, if people can recommend a good reference (book, website) on the subject, it would also be much appreciated. There are tons of info on the net, but it's usually very case-specific and experts-oriented.

Thanks!

PS: This is not about finding leaks, no problem there, just trying to understand memory management better and be pre-emptive for the future, as our application uses more and more memory.

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Some of your questions are easy. Well, one of them anyway!

Why is there some FastMM-allocated memory and some "System-allocated" (and reserved) memory? Since FastMM is the memory manager, why is the system in charge of allocating some of the memory?

The code that you write in Delphi is only part of what runs in your process. You use 3rd party libraries in the form of DLLs, most notably the Windows API. Anytime you create a Delphi form, for example, there are a lot of windows objects behind it that consume memory. This memory does not get allocated by FastMM and I presume is what is termed "system-allocated" in your question.

However, if you want to go any deeper then this very rapidly becomes an extremely complex topic. If you do want to go deeper into the implementation of Windows memory management then I think you need to consult a serious reference source. I suggest Windows Internals by Mark Russinovich, David Solomon and Alex Ionescu.

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Thanks David, I assumed that FastMM would somehow take over all memory allocation including that resulting from API calls. Seems I was wrong! :o) I'll get a copy of that book and see what I can learn from it. – Bourgui Mar 28 '11 at 20:43

First off, I'm a little confused by the terminology: why is there some FastMM-allocated memory and some "System-allocated" (and reserved) memory? Since FastMM is the memory manager, why is the system in charge of allocating some of the memory?

Where do you suppose FastMM gets the memory to allocate? It comes from the system, of course.

When your app starts up, FastMM gets a block of memory from the system. When you ask for some memory to use (whether with GetMem, New, or TSomething.Create), FastMM tries to give it to you from that first initial block. If there's not enough there, FastMM asks for more (in one block if possible) from the system, and returns a chunk of that to you. When you free something, FastMM doesn't return that memory to the OS, because it figures you'll use it again. It just marks it as unused internally. It also tries to realign unused blocks so that they're as contiguous as possible, in order to try not to have to go back to the OS for more needlessly. (This realignment isn't always possible, though; that's where you end up with memory fragmentation from things like multiple resizing of dynamic arrays, lots of object creates and frees, and so forth.)

In addition to the memory FastMM manages in your app, the system sets aside room for the stack and heap. Each process gets a meg of stack space when it starts up, as room to put variables. This stack (and the heap) can grow dynamically as needed.

When your application exits, all of the memory it's allocated is released back to the OS. (It may not appear so immediately in Task Manager, but it is.)

Is it possible for example to get a report, mid-execution, similar to what FastMM generates upon closing the application?

Not as far as I can tell. Because FastMM stores it somewhere doesn't necessarily mean there's a way to access it during runtime from outside the memory manager. You can look at the source for FastMMUsageTracker to see how the information is retrieved (using GetMemoryManagerState and GetMemoryMap, in the RefreshSnapshot method). The source to FastMM4 is also available; you can look and see what public methods are available.

FastMM's own documentation (in the form of the readme files, FastMM4Options.inc comments, and the FastMM4_FAQ.txt file) is useful to some extent in explaining how it works and what debugging options (and information) is available.

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I'm not sure that's what "system-allocated" means in this instance. A comment in the code next to if AMemoryMap[LInd] = csExSysAllocated says: "If the chunk is not allocated by this MM, what is its status?" – David Heffernan Mar 28 '11 at 19:11
    
@David, you must have a more recent version of FastMM4 than I do. csExSysAllocated isn't in my FastMM4.pas or the UsageTracker code. Neither is the comment you quoted. I guess it's time to update. – Ken White Mar 28 '11 at 19:52
    
Thanks Ken. I understand that FastMM allocates memory from the system itself, but my question stemmed from the fact that I assumed, wrongly, that it would then somehow handle all memory allocation relative to the application, except for external DLLs and such. I didn't realize that the Windows would take over for any memory allocation resulting from API calls. I did start looking into the FastMM4 code, but it's quite complex and I was hoping I had just missed an existing function. Looks like I'm diving back in! :o) – Bourgui Mar 28 '11 at 20:40
    
@Bourgui: FastMM4 can't handle any allocation done by API calls (Windows DLLs); memory has to be allocated and free'd by the same memory manager, and of course Windows itself doesn't use FastMM4. :) The OS is involved in some way with all memory allocations; FastMM4 just tries to optimize it internally for your Delphi code (and does so far better than the original BorlandMM - that's why FastMM4 is now the default memory manager and is used by the IDE itself). – Ken White Mar 28 '11 at 20:45

For a detailed map of what memory a process is using, try VMMAP from www.sysinternals.com (also co-authored by Mark Russinovich, mentioned in David's answer). This also allows you to see what is stored in some of the locations (type control-T when a detail line is selected).

Warning: there is much more memory in use by your process than you might think. You may need to read the book first.

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Pretty cool tool, thank you. – Bourgui Mar 28 '11 at 20:51

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