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I am using the datetime Python module. I am looking to calculate the date 6 months from the current date. Could someone give me a little help doing this?

The reason I want to generate a date 6 months from the current date is to produce a Review Date. If the user enters data into the system it will have a review date of 6 months from the date they entered the data.

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You will have to be more specific : when is six months from march 31th? And from august 30th? –  kmkaplan Feb 13 '09 at 15:21
3  
Yes the edit helps: it means you can aproximate 6 months to 183 days with no ill effect. So adding 183 days to today will do the trick. –  kmkaplan Feb 13 '09 at 16:42
3  
The above comments strike me as silly. The concept of "adding six months" is quite clear -- take the month component and add 6 to it, with support for rolling over the year (and cycling the month back to 1) if we go past December. This happens to be exactly what relativedelta does and is in fact what every programming language with support for this sort of concept does. –  Kirk Woll Jul 18 '12 at 18:30

27 Answers 27

up vote 46 down vote accepted
import datetime
print (datetime.date.today() + datetime.timedelta(6*365/12)).isoformat()
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19  
That probably breaks with today... –  vdboor Feb 29 '12 at 9:37
1  
@vdboor: this is a known problem, see my second comment to RailsSon’s question. –  kmkaplan Mar 4 '12 at 20:34
1  
ah yes, if accuracy is not important, adding timedelta is the easy solution! –  vdboor Mar 6 '12 at 11:02

I found this solution to be good. (This uses the python-dateutil extension, http://labix.org/python-dateutil )

from datetime import date
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

six_months = date.today() + relativedelta( months = +6 )

The advantage of this approach is that it takes care of issues with 28,30,31 days etc. This becomes very useful in handling business rules and scenarios (say invoice generation etc.)

$ date(2010,12,31)+relativedelta(months=+1)
  datetime.date(2011, 1, 31)

$ date(2010,12,31)+relativedelta(months=+2)
  datetime.date(2011, 2, 28)
share|improve this answer
    
I think that's far more elegant as a solution, nice. –  Geekfish Oct 7 '11 at 14:46
3  
this solution is the pythonic way! Very nice! thanks –  Tarsis Azevedo Oct 12 '11 at 15:42
    
+1. Nice and clean. –  tatlar Mar 13 '12 at 20:39
    
Best answer :-) works for me –  Maksym Kozlenko Mar 31 '12 at 6:36
    
Love this answer, but isn't the + before the 6 redundant? –  MFB Oct 22 '12 at 22:51

Well, that depends what you mean by 6 months from the current date.

1) natural months,

   (day,month,year) = (day,(month+6)%12,year+(month+6)/12)

2) bankers definition, 6*30

   date += datetime.timedelta(6*30)
share|improve this answer
2  
Could you throw in the half-year definition (183 days) plus the 26 weeks definition, too? It helps to have them all in one place. –  S.Lott Feb 13 '09 at 18:02
4  
just a quick remark: I think, for month, the formula would be instead (month + 5) % 12 + 1 b/c for june, your formula gives 0 whereas the expected result is 12... despite this little error, to my mind, your answer is the one that best answers the question –  PierrOz Mar 15 '10 at 16:02
1  
and same for year: it should be year + (month + 5)/12 –  PierrOz Mar 15 '10 at 16:15
4  
What if the date is 31, and the month six month later can't have 31 days (which is the case for most months with 31 days)? –  akv Apr 6 '11 at 11:37

What do you mean by '6 months'. Is 2009-02-13 + 6 months == 2009-08-13 or is it 2009-02-13 + 6*30 days?

import mx.DateTime as dt

#6 Months
dt.now()+dt.RelativeDateTime(months=6)
#result is '2009-08-13 16:28:00.84'

#6*30 days
dt.now()+dt.RelativeDateTime(days=30*6)
#result is '2009-08-12 16:30:03.35'

More info about mx.DateTime

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This solution works correctly for December, which most of the answers on this page do not. You need to first shift the months from base 1 (ie Jan = 1) to base 0 (ie Jan = 0) before using modulus ( % ) or integer division ( // ), otherwise November (11) plus 1 month gives you 12, which when finding the remainder ( 12 % 12 ) gives 0.

(And dont suggest "(month % 12) + 1" or Oct + 1 = december!)

def AddMonths(d,x):
    newmonth = ((( d.month - 1) + x ) % 12 ) + 1
    newyear  = d.year + ((( d.month - 1) + x ) / 12 ) 
    return datetime.date( newyear, newmonth, d.day)

However ... This doesnt account for problem like Jan 31 + one month. So we go back to the OP - what do you mean by adding a month? One soln is to backtrack until you get to a valid day, given that most people would presume the last day of jan, plus one month, equals the last day of Feb. This will work on negative numbers of months too. Proof:

>>> import datetime
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),1)
datetime.date(2010, 9, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),4)
datetime.date(2010, 12, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),5)
datetime.date(2011, 1, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),13)
datetime.date(2011, 9, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),24)
datetime.date(2012, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-1)
datetime.date(2010, 7, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),0)
datetime.date(2010, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-12)
datetime.date(2009, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-8)
datetime.date(2009, 12, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-7)
datetime.date(2010, 1, 25)>>> 
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Just use the timetuple method to extract the months, add your months and build a new dateobject. If there is a already existing method for this I do not know it.

import datetime

def in_the_future(months=1):
    year, month, day = datetime.date.today().timetuple()[:3]
    new_month = month + months
    return datetime.date(year + (new_month / 12), new_month % 12, day)

The API is a bit clumsy, but works as an example. Will also obviously not work on corner-cases like 2008-01-31 + 1 month. :)

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2  
Error in your code: new_month % 12 should be (new_month % 12) or 12. Otherwise if you try this in November you will get an error. :) –  Jordan Reiter May 2 '11 at 21:45

Dateutil package has implementation of such functionality. But be aware, that this will be naive, as others pointed already.

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dateutil is awesome. It can be installed with easy_install too. –  Soviut Feb 13 '09 at 15:42
    
Excellent. Thanks for suggesting that. That seems to be a god-sent. –  ayaz Apr 21 '10 at 7:38
    
agree, deteutil is awsome –  nemesisdesign Nov 17 '10 at 16:52
    
Seems to work fine with my non-naive datetimes. –  Erik Feb 12 '13 at 6:58

There's no direct way to do it with Python's datetime.

Check out the relativedelta type at python-dateutil. It allows you to specify a time delta in months.

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I know this was for 6 months, however the answer shows in google for "adding months in python" if you are adding one month:

import calendar

date = datetime.date.today()    //Or your date

datetime.timedelta(days=calendar.monthrange(date.year,date.month)[1])

this would count the days in the current month and add them to the current date, using 365/12 would ad 1/12 of a year can causes issues for short / long months if your iterating over the date.

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The QDate class of PyQt4 has an addmonths function.

>>>from PyQt4.QtCore import QDate  
>>>dt = QDate(2009,12,31)  
>>>required = dt.addMonths(6) 

>>>required
PyQt4.QtCore.QDate(2010, 6, 30)

>>>required.toPyDate()
datetime.date(2010, 6, 30)
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So, here is an example of the dateutil.relativedelta which I found useful for iterating through the past year, skipping a month each time to the present date:

>>> import datetime
>>> from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
>>> today = datetime.datetime.today()
>>> month_count = 0
>>> while month_count < 12:
...  day = today - relativedelta(months=month_count)
...  print day
...  month_count += 1
... 
2010-07-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-06-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-05-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-04-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-03-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-02-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-01-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-12-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-11-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-10-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-09-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-08-07 10:51:45.187968

As with the other answers, you have to figure out what you actually mean by "6 months from now." If you mean "today's day of the month in the month six years in the future" then this would do:

datetime.datetime.now() + relativedelta(months=6)
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import time

def add_month(start_time, months):  

        ret = time.strptime(start_time, '%Y-%m-%d')
        t = list(ret)

        t[1] += months

        if t[1] > 12:
            t[0] += 1 + int(months / 12)

            t[1] %= 12

        return int(time.mktime(tuple(t)))
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I solved this problem like this:

import calendar
from datetime import datetime
moths2add = 6
now = datetime.now()
current_year = now.year
current_month = now.month
#count days in months you want to add using calendar module
days = sum(
  [calendar.monthrange(current_year, elem)[1] for elem in range(current_month, current_month + moths)]
    )
print now + days
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import datetime


'''
Created on 2011-03-09

@author: tonydiep
'''

def add_business_months(start_date, months_to_add):
    """
    Add months in the way business people think of months. 
    Jan 31, 2011 + 1 month = Feb 28, 2011 to business people
    Method: Add the number of months, roll back the date until it becomes a valid date
    """
    # determine year
    years_change = months_to_add / 12

    # determine if there is carryover from adding months
    if (start_date.month + (months_to_add % 12) > 12 ):
        years_change = years_change + 1

    new_year = start_date.year + years_change

    # determine month
    work = months_to_add % 12
    if 0 == work:
        new_month = start_date.month
    else:
        new_month = (start_date.month + (work % 12)) % 12

    if 0 == new_month:
        new_month = 12 

    # determine day of the month
    new_day = start_date.day
    if(new_day in [31, 30, 29, 28]):
        #user means end of the month
        new_day = 31


    new_date = None
    while (None == new_date and 27 < new_day):
        try:
            new_date = start_date.replace(year=new_year, month=new_month, day=new_day)
        except:
            new_day = new_day - 1   #wind down until we get to a valid date

    return new_date


if __name__ == '__main__':
    #tests
    dates = [datetime.date(2011, 1, 31),
             datetime.date(2011, 2, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 3, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 4, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 5, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 6, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 7, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 8, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 9, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 10, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 11, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 12, 28),
             ]
    months = range(1, 24)
    for start_date in dates:
        for m in months:
            end_date = add_business_months(start_date, m)
            print("%s\t%s\t%s" %(start_date, end_date, m))
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I have a better way to solve the 'February 31st' problem:

def add_months(start_date, months):
    import calendar

    year = start_date.year + (months / 12)
    month = start_date.month + (months % 12)
    day = start_date.day

    if month > 12:
        month = month % 12
        year = year + 1

    days_next = calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]
    if day > days_next:
        day = days_next

    return start_date.replace(year, month, day)

I think that it also works with negative numbers (to subtract months), but I haven't tested this very much.

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Modified the AddMonths() for use in Zope and handling invalid day numbers:

def AddMonths(d,x):
    days_of_month = [31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]
    newmonth = ((( d.month() - 1) + x ) % 12 ) + 1
    newyear  = d.year() + ((( d.month() - 1) + x ) // 12 ) 
    if d.day() > days_of_month[newmonth-1]:
      newday = days_of_month[newmonth-1]
    else:
      newday = d.day() 
    return DateTime( newyear, newmonth, newday)
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Yet another solution - hope someone will like it:

def add_months(d, months):
    return d.replace(year=d.year+months//12).replace(month=(d.month+months)%12)

This solution doesn't work for days 29,30,31 for all cases, so more robust solution is needed (which is not so nice anymore :) ):

def add_months(d, months):
    for i in range(4):
        day = d.day - i
        try:
            return d.replace(day=day).replace(year=d.year+int(months)//12).replace(month=(d.month+int(months))%12)
        except:
            pass
    raise Exception("should not happen")
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Use the python datetime module to add a timedelta of six months to datetime.today() .

http://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html

You will of course have to solve the issue raised by Johannes Weiß-- what do you mean by 6 months?

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1  
timedelta doesn't support months and so sidesteps the possible answers to the question "how many days in 6-month?" Eef's code will set a review date so I would suggest one could consider setting the timedelta using days (6*30). If the period represents clients' access to a product/service then a business definition may be required/preferred. –  Carl Sep 21 '09 at 15:46
    
As Carl pointed out, timedelta doesn't support months. –  Rob Flaherty Feb 27 '12 at 23:18

This is what I came up with. It moves the correct number of months and years but ignores days (which was what I needed in my situation).

import datetime

month_dt = 4
today = datetime.date.today()
y,m = today.year, today.month
m += month_dt-1
year_dt = m//12
new_month = m%12
new_date = datetime.date(y+year_dt, new_month+1, 1)
share|improve this answer

I use this function to change year and month but keep day:

def replace_month_year(date1, year2, month2):
    try:
        date2 = date1.replace(month = month2, year = year2)
    except:
        date2 = datetime.date(year2, month2 + 1, 1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    return date2

You should write:

new_year = my_date.year + (my_date.month + 6) / 12
new_month = (my_date.month + 6) % 12
new_date = replace_month_year(my_date, new_year, new_month)
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I think it would be safer to do something like this instead of manually adding days:

import datetime
today = datetime.date.today()

def addMonths(dt, months = 0):
    new_month = months + dt.month
    year_inc = 0
    if new_month>12:
        year_inc +=1
        new_month -=12
    return dt.replace(month = new_month, year = dt.year+year_inc)

newdate = addMonths(today, 6)
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my modification to tony diep's answer, possibly marginally more elegant:

def add_months(date, months):
    month = date.month + months - 1
    year = date.year + (month / 12)
    month = (month % 12) + 1
    day = date.day
    while (day > 0):
        try:
            new_date = date.replace(year=year, month=month, day=day)
            break
        except:
            day = day - 1    
    return new_date

adds months according to a business needs interpretation

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Rework of an earlier answer by user417751. Maybe not so pythonic way, but it takes care of different month lengths and leap years. In this case 31 January 2012 + 1 month = 29 February 2012.

import datetime
import calendar

def add_mths(d, x):
    newday = d.day
    newmonth = (((d.month - 1) + x) % 12) + 1
    newyear  = d.year + (((d.month - 1) + x) // 12)
    if newday > calendar.mdays[newmonth]:
        newday = calendar.mdays[newmonth]
        if newyear % 4 == 0 and newmonth == 2:
            newday += 1
    return datetime.date(newyear, newmonth, newday)
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Modified Johannes Wei's answer in the case 1new_month = 121. This works perfectly for me. The months could be positive or negative.

def addMonth(d,months=1):
    year, month, day = d.timetuple()[:3]
    new_month = month + months
    return datetime.date(year + ((new_month-1) / 12), (new_month-1) % 12 +1, day)
share|improve this answer
2  
It DOESN'T "work perfectly" when the day in the start date is greater than the number of days in the target month. Example: 2001-01-31 plus one month tries to create a date 2001-02-31. –  John Machin Jan 16 '10 at 9:25

In this function, n can be positive or negative.

def addmonth(d, n):
    n += 1
    dd = datetime.date(d.year + n/12, d.month + n%12, 1)-datetime.timedelta(1)
    return datetime.date(dd.year, dd.month, min(d.day, dd.day))
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We probably should use dateutil.relativedelta

however for academic interest I will just add that before I discovered it I was goint to use this:

try:
   vexpDt = K.today.replace(K.today.year + (K.today.month+6)//12, (K.today.month+5)%12+1, K.today.day)
except:
   vexpDt = K.today.replace(K.today.year + (K.today.month+6)//12, (K.today.month+6)%12+1, 1) - timedelta(days = 1)

it seems quite simple but still catches all the issues like 29,30,31

it also works for - 6 mths by doing -timedelta

nb - don't be confused by K.today its just a variable in my program

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    def addDay(date, number):
        for i in range(number)
            #try to add a day
            try:
                date = date.replace(day = date.day + 1)
            #in case it's impossible ex:january 32nd add a month and restart at day 1
            except:
                #add month part
                try:
                    date = date.replace(month = date.month +1, day = 1)
                except:
                    date = date.replace(year = date.year +1, month = 1, day = 1)

For everyone still reading this post. I think this code is way clearer, especially compared to code using modulo(%).

Sorry for any grammatical error, english is so not my main language

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