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I have a query that is timing out when I run it from my windows application. However it runs fine, in under 2 seconds when I run it directly in SSMS. All other queries run fine in the app. I have also run profiler and confirmed that the app is indeed running the query I expect it to (when I take the code that profiler shows was run by the app and run it in SSMS, it takes less than 2 seconds).

Longer running queries do not time out in the app.

What is going on?

    string result = dbHelper.GetTypedDataTable(dtMyProjects, "sp_get_DashboardPMMyProjects", MyUtility.DWConnection, new string[] { "'" + shortNTID + "'" });

    static public string GetTypedDataTable(DataTable dt, string sSPName, string connectionName, string[] arrayParameters)
    {
        if (connectionName == "default")
        {
            SetUpConnection(sSPName, "sqlConn.ConnectionString", "SP");
        }
        else
        {
            SetUpConnection(sSPName, connectionName, "SP");
        }

        cmdSELECT.CommandText += " " + arrayParameters[0].ToString();

        int countParameters = arrayParameters.Length;

        for (int i = 1; i < countParameters; i++)
        {
            cmdSELECT.CommandText += ", " + arrayParameters[i].ToString();
        }

        return FillDataTable(dt);
    }

    private static void SetUpConnection(string sSPName, string connectionName, string sqlType)
    {
        //sqlConn.ConnectionString = ((string)(configurationAppSettings.GetValue("sqlConn.ConnectionString", typeof(string))));

        sqlConn.ConnectionString = ((string)(configurationAppSettings.GetValue(connectionName, typeof(string))));
        daHlpr.SelectCommand = cmdSELECT;
        cmdSELECT.Connection = sqlConn;

        if (sqlType == "SP")
        {
            cmdSELECT.CommandText = "EXEC " + sSPName;
        }
        else
        {
            cmdSELECT.CommandText = sSPName;
        }
    }

    private static string FillDataTable(DataTable dt)
    {
        try
        {
            daHlpr.SelectCommand.CommandTimeout = 60;
            daHlpr.Fill(0, 1000000000, dt);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return ex.Message.ToString();
        }
        return dt.Rows.Count.ToString(); //return the count of rows in the table being returned
    }
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Can you add some code for what you are doing when executing the query via .net? –  Dustin Laine Mar 28 '11 at 18:51
    
@Dustin: There's the code for filling the dataset. It's very old code that I have been using forever. It makes it very easy to fill dataset and datatables with little effort. And the query that is now giving me problems has been running successfully for weeks. –  richard Mar 28 '11 at 19:01
    
Now it's working fine, I didn't even do anything. Could this be a network issue? –  richard Mar 28 '11 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

Two seconds is a pretty long time these days, there must be a decent amount of processing required.

If you are using a stored procedure, you may need to disable parameter sniffing.

Basically, store each SP parameter in a newly instantiated variable immediately upon SP execution. Here's a link with more details:

http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/2007/06/07/how-to-disable-parameter-sniffing-in-sql-server-2005/

Also, though it may seem obvious, sometimes it is easy to forget. These problems may evaporate upon Dev Machine Reboot, Sql Server Service Restart, or Sql Server Machine Reboot.

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1  
Watch the selectivity with that suggestion, as then the above workaround to parameter sniffing results in "variable sniffing", where the optimizer uses a "safe" statistical distribution percentage of ~30%. Getting rid of parameter sniffing using this method should be fine in the majority of cases, but you may be forced into recompiling or some other method if it still causes problems. –  Quantum Elf Mar 28 '11 at 19:22

try dropping and recreating the stored procedure.

My similar post

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2  
That will temporarily fix a parameter sniffing issue but obviously it can recur at any time unless changes are made to protect against this. –  Martin Smith Mar 28 '11 at 19:24

Are you correctly executing a reader or non reader command? A simple typo such as this can cause it to timeout waiting for a response an an insert or update query. Some code might also help with finding the issue.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

SQL Server was running at maximum RAM and as the day progressed, more and more queries were taking forever. Eventually none would run. Recycled SQL Server to reclaim the memory, and now I will have to diagnose why it was using so much RAM. Thanks all!

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