Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following two classes that exhibit the Command pattern. (Unfortunately, both have a unique method name.)

//pseudocode 
class Subscriber {
    virtual void receive(const Event&) = 0;
}

class Dispatcher {
    virtual void dispatch(const Event&) = 0;
}

I have a class template that has a list of some type with a method to iterate over this list.

//pseudocode
template<typename T>
class Registry {
    typedef list<T> ObjectList;
    ObjectList _objects;
    void iterate(const Event& event) {
        for_each(_objects.begin(), _objects.end(), ...);  //not sure what to do here
    }
}

I would like to use mem_fun to create a Functor that calls receive or dispatch as appropriate. I'm able to create a simple use case where I simply invoke a method without any params. I.e.

//pseudocode
class Simple {
    void simple() {/*...*/}
}

and then I iterate:

for_each(_objects.begin(), _objects.end(), mem_fun(&Simple::simple);

Unfortunately, I have no idea how to get the event param passed to mem_fun. Looking at the headers, it does appear that I can pass a single param, but I'm not well versed in C++ to understand what I need to do.

Ultimately, I would like to make the iterate method accept a type of functor so it will fire that method on every method in the list.

I would prefer to avoid Boost...I think this is entirely possible without dragging this framework into the mix.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This may be the most straight-forward way:

class event_forwarder // make private in Registry
{
public:
    event_forwarder(const Event& event) :
    mEvent(event)
    {}

    void operator()(Subscriber& subcriber) const
    {
        subscriber.receive(mEvent);
    }

    void operator()(Dispatcher& dispatcher) const
    {
        dispatcher.dispatch(mEvent);
    }

private:
    const Event& mEvent;
};

Then:

for_each(_objects.begin(), _objects.end(), event_forwarder(event));
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that is pretty straightforward...thanks! –  Tim Reddy Mar 28 '11 at 20:33
    
Assuming C++0x or TR1 features are not available, I like this solution, but the constructor should be explicit and the class should have a public typedef void result_type;. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '11 at 21:07
    
@ildjarn: Perhaps. Seeing as it's only used in one line of code, there may be no point. –  GManNickG Mar 28 '11 at 22:01

If I understand correctly, what you want is std::bind2nd:

std::for_each(_objects.begin(), _objects.end(), 
              std::bind2nd(std::mem_fun_ref(&Subscriber::receive), event));

The member-function Subscriber::receive has two parameters. The first is the implicit this pointer, and the second the const Event &. std::bind2nd, given a function f taking two arguments, returns a function f_1 taking one argument, that invokes the original function f with a fixed value for the second argument.

Edit:

To handle the different names of the dispatch functions, you can make the dispatch function a template parameter:

//pseudocode
template<typename T, void (T::*dispatch_method)(Event)>
class Registry {
    typedef list<T> ObjectList;
    ObjectList _objects;
    void iterate(const Event& event) {
        std::for_each(_objects.begin(), _objects.end(), 
                      std::bind2nd(std::mem_fun_ref(dispatch_method), event));
    }
}

Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a way to make bind2nd handle const reference parameters, so my whole solution is moot, unless copying Event objects is fine with you. This will work in C++0x with std::bind though, and the idea of making the dispatch function a template parameter is still valid. You can even use traits, to make that mechanism even more flexible.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that looks like what I want to do, but can you rewrite this answer to make the mem_fun() something I can pass into the iterate method? Right now, you've hardcoded the Subscriber's receive method in the for_each method...Thanks! –  Tim Reddy Mar 28 '11 at 20:35
    
The problem missed here is that T might not be Subscriber, but Dispatcher. Now your code doesn't work. You can either use overload resolution to switch based off types (my answer), or make two iterate functions and use enable_if to disable one of them based off T; but that requires Boost or C++0x. –  GManNickG Mar 28 '11 at 20:36
    
@GMan: See my edit. –  Björn Pollex Mar 28 '11 at 20:54

You could create a functor class that wraps your Subscriber and Dispatcher classes, e.g.

class MyFunctor {
  public:
    virtual void Execute(const Event& event) = 0;
};

class MySubscriberFunctor : public MyFunctor {
  private:
    Subscriber subscriber_;
  public:
    void Execute(const Event& event) {
      subscriber_.receive(event);    
    }
};

class MyDispatcherFunctor : public MyFunctor {
  private:
    Dispatcher dispatcher_;
  public:
    void Execute(const Event& event) {
      dispatcher_.dispatch(event);    
    }
};

Your object list could then store these functor wrappers as a list of MyFunctor instances. This way you can call Execute() on them and let them delegate to the underlying classes. You should really have an operator() instead of Execute() to get a "real" functor, but you get the idea.

Cheers

share|improve this answer

Check if you have tr1. If you have tr1, it contains std::bind, which is almost exactly equivalent to the boost implementation. This should be found in the <functional> header.

If you don't have tr1, consider using Boost. I would strongly suggest using at least boost::bind, as it's lightweight and header only.

If you don't have tr1 and won't use Boost, you want to mix bind2nd and mem_fun1. The first binds the second parameter (in this case, your event; the object will be the first) and mem_fun1 is the same as mem_fun, but it expects two arguments, the object to be called on and one parameter to pass the member function being called. This is a complete mess, though.

If you do have access to bind, it's fairly easy.

for_each(objects.begin(), objects.end(), bind(&Simple::simple, _1, event))

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.