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I wrote the following trace macro in a file named "debug.h".

#define TRACE(x)     \
    printf(          \
        "%s(%d): ",  \
        __FILE__,    \
        __LINE__     \
        );           \
                     \
  printf(x);

In debug I'd like to enable the macro only for certain files since resources are limited on the platform that I'm using. I don't want to completely remove the TRACE calls from the files. Just disable them.

Is there a clean way to do this in C using the preprocessor?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In debug.h:

#if TRACE_ENABLE
#define TRACE(x)     \
    printf(          \
        "%s(%d): ",  \
        __FILE__,    \
        __LINE__     \
        );           \
                     \
  printf(x);
#else
#define TRACE(x)
#endif

Then, in your source files where you don't want trace:

#define TRACE_ENABLE 0
#include "debug.h"

or just:

#include "debug.h"

In source files to enable trace:

#define TRACE_ENABLE 1
#include "debug.h"
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While both answers seems good to me, I think Giuseppe's answer is more useful most of the time since if you use this macro many times in a file, and you want to switch debug on/off for complete files, pmg's method is exhausting. The important thing is to not forget adding the else statement: #else TRACE(X); if you want to edit it in the specific file and not in header, use:

#ifdef TRACE
#undef TRACE
#endif
#define TRACE(X)
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A trick I've used somtimes is the use of a bit mask to enable a subset of the files whete the TRACE is used: File1.c:

#if TRACE_MASK & 0x01
#define TRACE(x) ...
#endif

File2.c:

#if TRACE_MASK & 0x02
#define TRACE(x) ...
#endif

... Then you can define your TRACE_MASK macro in the preprocessing options: /DTRACE_MASK=0x03 to enable the trace on both File1.c and File2.c The only problem is that there is a limited numner of bits... (but you can use more than one macro: TRACE_MASK1, TRACE_MASK2...) Bye

EDIT: of course you can write tdefinition once in a file "trace.h", and just redefine the mask in each source:

File trace.h:

#if TRACE_MASK & TRACE_CURRENT
#define TRACE(x) ...
#else
#define TRACE(x) do {} while(0)
#endif

File1.c:

#define TRACE_CURRENT 0x01
#include "trace.h"

File2.c:

#define TRACE_CURRENT 0x02
#include "trace.h"
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What about

#define TRACE(x, y) do if (y) {/*your prints*/} while (0)

and also

#define TRACE_ENABLE 1

or

#define TRACE_ENABLE 0

at the top of your sources.

Then replace the TRACE invocations with

TRACE(foo, TRACE_ENABLE);
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