Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to split a file? For example you have huge wordlist, I want to split it so that it becomes more than one file. How is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
This is certainly possible. If you want useful answers, you may want to provide some useful details. –  EBGreen Feb 13 '09 at 16:08
    
do you want to do it with python? how is this file structured? is it a text file? –  Paolo Tedesco Feb 13 '09 at 16:10
    
add comment

7 Answers 7

This one splits a file up by newlines and writes it back out. You can change the delimiter easily. This can also handle uneven amounts as well, if you don't have a multiple of splitLen lines (20 in this example) in your input file.

splitLen = 20         # 20 lines per file
outputBase = 'output' # output.1.txt, output.2.txt, etc.

# This is shorthand and not friendly with memory
# on very large files (Sean Cavanagh), but it works.
input = open('input.txt', 'r').read().split('\n')

at = 1
for lines in range(0, len(input), splitLen):
    # First, get the list slice
    outputData = input[lines:lines+splitLen]

    # Now open the output file, join the new slice with newlines
    # and write it out. Then close the file.
    output = open(outputBase + str(at) + '.txt', 'w')
    output.write('\n'.join(outputData))
    output.close()

    # Increment the counter
    at += 1
share|improve this answer
    
Might mention that for REALLY BIG FILES, open().read() chews a lot of memory and time. But mostly it's okay. –  Sean Cavanagh Feb 13 '09 at 16:21
    
Oh, I know. I just wanted to throw together a working script quickly, and I normally work with small files. I end up with shorthand like that. –  sli Feb 15 '09 at 21:06
add comment

A better loop for sli's example, not hogging memory :

splitLen = 20         # 20 lines per file
outputBase = 'output' # output.1.txt, output.2.txt, etc.

input = open('input.txt', 'r')

count = 0
at = 0
dest = None
for line in input:
    if count % splitLen == 0:
        if dest: dest.close()
        dest = open(outputBase + str(at) + '.txt', 'w')
        at += 1
    dest.write(line)
    count += 1
share|improve this answer
add comment

Solution to split binary files into chapters .000, .001, etc.:

FILE = 'scons-conversion.7z'

MAX  = 500*1024*1024 # 500Mb  - max chapter size
BUF  = 50*1024*1024  # 50GB   - memory buffer size

chapters = 0
uglybuf  = ''
with open(FILE, 'rb') as src:
  while True:
    tgt = open(FILE+'.%03d' % chapters, 'wb')
    written = 0
    while written < MAX:
      tgt.write(uglybuf)
      tgt.write(src.read(min(BUF, MAX-written)))
      written += min(BUF, MAX-written)
      uglybuf = src.read(1)
      if len(uglybuf) == 0:
        break
    tgt.close()
    if len(uglybuf) == 0:
      break
    chapters += 1
share|improve this answer
add comment

Sure it's possible:

open input file
open output file 1
count = 0
for each line in file:
    write to output file
    count = count + 1
    if count > maxlines:
         close output file
         open next output file
         count = 0
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to reset your count after opening the new file... –  Sean Cavanagh Feb 13 '09 at 16:20
    
right, or test count mod maxlines. –  Charlie Martin Feb 13 '09 at 19:05
add comment
def split_file(file, prefix, max_size, buffer=1024):
"""
file: the input file
prefix: prefix of the output files that will be created
max_size: maximum size of each created file in bytes
buffer: buffer size in bytes

Returns the number of parts created.
"""
with open(file, 'r+b') as src:
    suffix = 0
    while True:
        with open(prefix + '.%s' % suffix, 'w+b') as tgt:
            written = 0
            while written <= max_size:
                data = src.read(buffer)
                if data:
                    tgt.write(data)
                    written += buffer
                else:
                    return suffix
            suffix += 1


def cat_files(infiles, outfile, buffer=1024):
"""
infiles: a list of files
outfile: the file that will be created
buffer: buffer size in bytes
"""
with open(outfile, 'w+b') as tgt:
    for infile in sorted(infiles):
        with open(infile, 'r+b') as src:
            while True:
                data = src.read(buffer)
                if data:
                    tgt.write(data)
                else:
                    break
share|improve this answer
add comment

Sure, just read in the file and write out some of the words to each different output file. It's possible to do this in any programming language.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Easily. I'd suggest iterating over the file and writing to a new file as necessary, then deleting the original. This answer is fairly intuitive to me, though, so I'm not sure if it's insufficient, or if perhaps it needs more clarification.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.