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In the PHP Zend Framework coding style:

The style for classes and functions is like the Microsoft style - brace aligned, while the style for control statements such as if and switch is K&R - brace offset.

Can anyone offer a rationale for why the two distinct styles are used within the same standard?

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What do you expect as answer? No coding style has any other rational reason, than to "force" a consistent style within the project. The zf maintainers decided to use this style, thats all. I dont think its worth to think about ;) – KingCrunch Mar 28 '11 at 22:09
I think this coding style is adopted from the c++ coding style. It's a little bit old fashion but still very nice IMO. – superbly Mar 28 '11 at 22:09
Might just as well be PEAR inspired. They do it like that, too. Consider asking on a ZF mailing list if you want to know for sure. – Gordon Mar 28 '11 at 22:11
@KingCrunch: If you really think that way, you should read David Straker's book on the subject. It is a subject that can be treated seriously, and scientifically, with a little work. – David Watson Mar 28 '11 at 22:36
@Gordon has it. The ZF coding standards are based on those of PEAR with some modifications – Phil Mar 28 '11 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Matthew Weier O'Phinney answers it best at:

In large part, our standards are adopted from PEAR coding standards (which in turn were adopted from Horde CS); our goal is to have standards that are interchangeable with other projects, to ensure code consistency and readability. PEAR standards are widely adopted (ADODb, Solar, Phing, and others all use PEAR CS), and are a logical choice.

If you want to know why 1TB is used as it is, I suggest looking at the list archives for the PEAR and Horde projects.

Discussion of the coding standards:

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