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In the UnitTest++ framework, in the Checks.cpp module there are 4 overloaded versions of CheckEqual. Each overload takes a different constness for expected or actual. Then all four just call CheckStringsEqual() which takes char const* for both expected and actual. I can remove the overloads and everything compiles fine but the unit tests fail when passed anything other than two const strings when the strings are declared using array syntax i.e.

char txt1[]="Hello";

Clarification The original UnitTest++ code exhibits this behavior, not just my implementation of it. Also it's the fact that the tests fail when the overloads are removed that has me stymied.

The four overloads are:

void CheckEqual(TestResults& results, 
                char const* expected, 
                char const* actual, 
                TestDetails const& details, 
                std::string const& msg) //msg defaults to ="" in .h
{
    CheckStringsEqual(results, expected, actual, details, msg);
}

void CheckEqual(TestResults& results, 
                char* expected, 
                char* actual, 
                TestDetails const& details)
{
    CheckStringsEqual(results, expected, actual, details);
}

void CheckEqual(TestResults& results, 
                char* expected, 
                char const* actual, 
                TestDetails const& details)
{
    CheckStringsEqual(results, expected, actual, details);
}

void CheckEqual(TestResults& results, 
                char const* expected, 
                char* actual, 
                TestDetails const& details)
{
    CheckStringsEqual(results, expected, actual, details);
}

CheckStringsEqual is

    void CheckStringsEqual(TestResults& results, 
                           char const* expected, 
                           char const* actual,
                           TestDetails const& details, std::string const& msg="")
    {
        using namespace std;

        if (strcmp(expected, actual))
        {
            UnitTest::MemoryOutStream stream;
            stream << msg;
            stream << " Expected " << expected << " but was " << actual;

            results.OnTestFailure(details, stream.GetText());
        }
    }

Finally here are the tests where some of them fail if you comment out all but the first CheckEqual

char txt1[] = "Hello"; // non-const on purpose so no folding of duplicate data

char txt2[] = "Hello";

TEST(CheckEqualsWithStringsWorksOnContentsNonConstNonConst)  
{
    char const* const p1 = txt1;
    char const* const p2 = txt2;
    TestResults results;
    CheckEqual(results, p1, p2, TestDetails("", "", "", 0));
    CHECK_EQUAL(0, results.GetFailureCount());
}

TEST(CheckEqualsWithStringsWorksOnContentsConstConst) 
{
    char* const p1 = txt1;
    char* const p2 = txt2;
    TestResults results;
    CheckEqual(results, p1, p2, TestDetails("", "", "", 0));
    CHECK_EQUAL(0, results.GetFailureCount());
}

TEST(CheckEqualsWithStringsWorksOnContentsNonConstConst)
{
char* const p1 = txt1;
char const* const p2 = txt2;
TestResults results;
CheckEqual(results, p1, p2, TestDetails("", "", "", 0));
CHECK_EQUAL(0, results.GetFailureCount());
}

TEST(CheckEqualsWithStringsWorksOnContentsConstNonConst)
{
char const* const p1 = txt1;
char* const p2 = txt2;
TestResults results;
CheckEqual(results, p1, p2, TestDetails("", "", "", 0));
CHECK_EQUAL(0, results.GetFailureCount());
}
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1 Answer 1

The first CheckEqual function takes an extra parameter and it does not have a default value. I see your code calling it without that std::string parameter. Therefor, I would expect the compiler to say that it cannot find a function to call.

With the same number of parameters, I am not sure why they would be const overloaded in that way. You can always make a non-const variable const, and if you aren't changing it, you should do this (CheckStringsEqual is not changing it).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I forgot I was messing around with that first call. In the .h file that final parameter is defaulted to ="". For the sake of this dicussion we can ignore that parameter as the original UnitTest++ code didn't have it. I should also clarify I'm asking why the UnitTest++ code needed to do this (i.e. even though I've changed some things the original code exhibits the described behavior). –  Tod Mar 29 '11 at 22:57

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