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I have a SQL query with a where clause like so:

Where ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID
    AND ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T)
            AND RelatedItemID IN (SELECT RelatedItemID FROM @T)

What would give me the best performance or is the proper way to do this? 3 indexes - one on each column or a single index that includes all 3?

HERE IS A MORE COMPLETE VIWE OF THE SP BEING RUN:

DECLARE @T TABLE (
    [CategoryID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [ManufacturerID] [int] NULL,
    [ItemID] [varchar](100) NOT NULL,
    [ItemName] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [PhotoName] [varchar](150) NULL,
    [ModifiedOn] [datetime] NULL,
    [ModifiedBy] [varchar](50) NULL,
    [IsDeleted] [bit] NOT NULL)

    ;WITH T As
(SELECT     CategoryID, ManufacturerID, ItemID, ItemName, PhotoName, ModifiedOn, ModifiedBy, IsDeleted
FROM         StagingCategoryItems
WHERE     (ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID)
EXCEPT
SELECT     CategoryID, ManufacturerID, ItemID, ItemName, PhotoName, ModifiedOn, ModifiedBy, IsDeleted
FROM         CategoryProducts
WHERE     (ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID)
)
INSERT INTO  @T
SELECT * 
FROM T


    DELETE FROM CategoryProducts WHERE ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID
        AND ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T)
        AND CategoryID IN(SELECT  CategoryID FROM @T)

    INSERT INTO [CategoryProducts]
           ([CategoryID]
           ,[ManufacturerID]
           ,[ItemID]
           ,[ItemName]
           ,[PhotoName]
           ,[CreatedOn]
           ,[CreatedBy]
           ,[ModifiedOn]
           ,[ModifiedBy]
           ,[DeletedOn]
           ,[DeletedBy]
           ,[IsDeleted])
      SELECT [CategoryID]
      ,[ManufacturerID]
      ,[ItemID]
      ,[ItemName]
      ,[PhotoName]
      ,[CreatedOn]
      ,[CreatedBy]
      ,[ModifiedOn]
      ,[ModifiedBy]
      ,[DeletedOn]
      ,[DeletedBy]
      ,[IsDeleted]
  FROM [StagingCategoryItems]
  WHERE ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID
    AND ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T)
            AND CategoryID IN(SELECT  CategoryID FROM @T)
share|improve this question
    
Provide little more detail as to what is the data, what you are trying to query, and full query SQL. Its hard to understand what you are trying to achieve here. –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 28 '11 at 23:55
    
It depends what's in the select list of this query, and the overall query workload, and the existing indexes. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 29 '11 at 0:07
    
Also, have you determined by measuring that you have a performance problem? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 29 '11 at 0:24
    
I actually found where my performance problem was coming from that caused this questions to be asked. But this is one of several SP's run in succession. Trying to be a bit pro-active so I don't run into performance issues and most of them SP's use a similar query like above so i want to setup indexes that will help with performance. –  Slee Mar 29 '11 at 0:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T)
AND RelatedItemID IN (SELECT RelatedItemID FROM @T)

Now this is a very dangerous condition. It expresses the condition that the current ItemID is in @T and the RelatedItemID is also in @T, but note that they do no have to be on the same row in @T. To give an example, if @T contains:

ItemID RelatedItemId
1      2
3      4

and in your table you have a row like:

ItemID  RelatedItemId
1       4

the WHERE condition will be TRUE. Are you sure this is the resolution you want?

As for your original indexes question: unfortunately the answer to this is 'it depends'. A number of index combinations can be good, and exactly the same indexes can be bad, depending on your actual data. When approaching a question like yours you need to ask yourself the question 'which condition is most restrictive, and how restrictive it is?'.

Say that your ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID will restrict the number of candidate rows to about 10% (eg. you have 10 distinct manufacturers), the ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T) restricts to a constant size of 100 rows in average, and the last condition does the same. Then even a single index on ItemID will be enough. Specially if is the clustered index, but even as a NC index, you're talking about an average 100 key lookps, which is small change.

But now lets say that Say that your ManufacturerID = @ManufacturerID will restrict the number of candidate rows to about 10%, the ItemID IN (SELECT ItemID FROM @T) restricts to a about 5% of the total number of rows, and the last condition does the same, but the exact match of all three conditions is only .0001% of the rows. Now no single column index would help, you need a index that includes all three. In what order? Excellent question.

I recommend you go over the General Index Design Guidelines.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the insight, especially the dangerous condition I have going on - any pointer on how to sort that issue out? –  Slee Mar 29 '11 at 1:42

A general rule with any SQL server(PostgreSQL, Oracle, MySQL....) not just Microsoft SQL Server performance question is to test it under your workload and see what the explain plan gives and if the performance meets your requirements. Test a few options out and see how it effects the explain plan and performance(aka time to completion in most cases). I find you don't need to even know much about a database if you can prove it with really good testing. Not that know how is not of value, but all the know how in the world seldom beats real world tests.

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One, since the other two are table variables.

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