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I've got an object model that is persisted using Seam and JPA (Hibernate). It looks something like this:

@Entity(name = "MyObject")
public class MyObject {

...

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE, generator = "seq_myobj")
@SequenceGenerator(name = "seq_myobj", sequenceName = "seq_myobj")
private Long id = null;

@ManyToOne(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, optional = false)
@NotNull
   private MySubObject subObjA=null;

@ManyToOne(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, optional = false)
@NotNull
   private MySubObject subObjB=null;

...

}

@Entity(name = "MySubObject")
public class MySubObject {

...

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE, generator = "seq_mysubobj")
@SequenceGenerator(name = "seq_mysubobj", sequenceName = "seq_mysubobj")
private Long id = null;

}

I've defined my @ManyToOne annotations correctly and everything. However, if I try and persist an instance of MyObject where both subObjA and subObjB are set, I get an exception saying I've got a duplicate primary key one of the sub obj's. What would cause this behavior? Both objects have their identifier types set to SEQUENCE, and I have no problem if I set one or the other. It's only when I set both that I get the exception.

I'm running Seam 2.2 and my backend database is PostgreSQL. Any thoughts on what could be causing this strange behavior? I thought both objects would be persisted as part of the same transaction and that the correct primary keys would be assigned automatically. Like I said, if I only set one of the objects there is no issue. It only happens when I set them both. Any help you can give would be GREATLY appreciated.

EDIT I've noticed some strange behavior in testing out various things, however. If I create MyObject programmatically and set all of its properties (including subObj) it persists with no problem. However, if I enter the properties using a form, I get the error. Could it have something to do with transactions?

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2  
Can you show us all the JPA annotations you have applied? – millhouse Mar 29 '11 at 0:28
    
Please tell us if you override equals/hashCode in MySubObject class. – Stefano Travelli Mar 29 '11 at 11:16
    
Edited to include annotations on the subObjA/B properties – Shadowman Mar 29 '11 at 17:18
    
Yes, I implemented equals/hashCode on MySubObject – Shadowman Mar 29 '11 at 17:18
    
@Shadowman Can you show a simplified version of your form and how do you save your myObject along with its mySubObject properties ? Just an advice: Not initialized fields are implicit null, so you do not need to write private MySubObject subObjA = null; Just private MySubObject subObjA; is enough. – Arthur Ronald Mar 31 '11 at 4:25

If you override equals/hashCode in MySubObject class be sure that these methods only check the surrogate key id (in such a case you should avoid them completely).

If equals/hashCode methods work with some business key properties, make sure that these keys are unique before persisting.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that, but still receive the same error. I've noticed some strange behavior in testing out various things, however. If I create MyObject programmatically and set all of its properties (including subObj) it persists with no problem. However, if I enter the properties using a form, I get the error. Could it have something to do with transactions? – Shadowman Mar 31 '11 at 0:58
    
It could have to do with transactions if the form behaves like this: the first subObj get persisted with an ID from the sequence in a transaction that fails. The consequent exception is masked and the code continues persisting the second subObj, so that it gets the same ID. – Stefano Travelli Mar 31 '11 at 7:25
    
The form is part of a 2-step data submission process. On the first page, the user enters some basic info about the data they're submitting. On the second page, they enter more detailed info, including setting properties on subObjA and subObjB. The entityManager.update() call doesn't get made until the user clicks "Submit" on the second page. That's where I see the exception, so now I'm thinking it's something related to this workflow, since I can create object programmatically with no problem. Any idea what's going on? Things I should try? – Shadowman Mar 31 '11 at 12:56
    
Not that this must be necessarily related to the duplicated key problem, but usually you don't call entityManager.update() in a conversation driven application. If entity is persistent you update it at flush() time, otherwise you persist it with entityManager.persist(). I suggest to turn SQL logging on and see what happens with the DB during the 2 step. According to the submission process you described there shouldn't be any SQL command at step 1. – Stefano Travelli Mar 31 '11 at 19:43
    
I misspoke. I amcalling persist() when I store the data. – Shadowman Apr 1 '11 at 15:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ran through a battery of tests and different scenarios, and have found occasions when it works. So, it looks like there is a bug in my action class when I got to submit and persist to the database.

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