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this might be a trivial question but: Since ADO.NET entity framework automatically tracks changes (in generated entities) and therefore keeps the original values, how can I rollback changes made to the entity objects?

I have a form which allows the user to edit a set of "Customer" entities in a grid view.

Now I have two buttons "Accept" and "Revert": if "Accept" is clicked, I call Context.SaveChanges() and the changed objects are written back to the database. If "Revert" is clicked, I would like for all objects to get their original property values. What would be the code for that?

Thanks

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11 Answers 11

up vote 38 down vote accepted

There is no revert or cancel changes operation in EF. Each entity has ObjectStateEntry in ObjectStateManager. State entry contains original and actual values so you can use original values to overwrite current values but you must do it manually for each entity. It will not reveret changes in navigation properties / relations.

The common way to "revert changes" is disposing context and reload entities. If you want to avoid reloading you must create clones of entities and modify those clones in new object context. If user cancel changes you will still have original entities.

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1  
Thanks. This seems to me to be a candidate for some generic solution, though... –  MartinStettner Mar 29 '11 at 6:21
2  
@LadislavMrnka Surely Context.Refresh() is a counter-example to your claim that there is no revert operation? Using Refresh() seems a better approach (i.e. more easily targeted at specific entities) than disposing the context and losing all tracked changes. –  robjb Feb 14 '12 at 19:21
10  
@robjb: No. Refresh is able to refresh only single entity or collection of entities which you manually define but refreshing functionality only affects simple properties (not relations). It also doesn't solve problem with added or deleted entities. –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 14 '12 at 20:38
    
@LadislavMrnka I see, thanks for your clarification! –  robjb Feb 14 '12 at 21:07

Query ChangeTracker of DbContext for dirty items. Set deleted items state to unchanged and added items to detached. For modified items, use original values and set current values of the entry. Finally set state of modified entry to unchanged:

    public void RollBack()
    {
        var context = DataContextFactory.GetDataContext();
        var changedEntries = context.ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => x.State != EntityState.Unchanged).ToList();

        foreach (var entry in changedEntries.Where(x=>x.State == EntityState.Modified))
        {
            entry.CurrentValues.SetValues(entry.OriginalValues);
            entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged;
        }

        foreach (var entry in changedEntries.Where(x=>x.State == EntityState.Added))
        {
            entry.State = EntityState.Detached;
        }

        foreach (var entry in changedEntries.Where(x=>x.State == EntityState.Deleted))
        {
            entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged;
        }

    }
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Thanks - this really helped me! –  Matt Oct 22 '13 at 11:13
    
You are the best !! –  Ahmad Dekmak Nov 18 '13 at 18:15
3  
You should probably set the original values to deleted entries as well. It's possible you first changed an item and deleted it after that. –  Bas de Raad Mar 7 '14 at 20:21
5  
Setting State to EntityState.Unchanged will override all values with Original Values as well so there is no need to call SetValues method. –  Abolfazl Hosnoddin Apr 19 '14 at 9:49
    
Any idea what to do when Entries() throws? It's throwing for me for an entity that has a composite PK but the PK values were not yet set. –  Yuyo Sep 8 '14 at 21:05

This worked for me:

dataContext.customer.Context.Refresh(RefreshMode.StoreWins, item);

Where item is the customer entity to be reverted.

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dbContext.Entry(entity).Reload();

Accroding to MSDN:

Reloads the entity from the database overwriting any property values with values from the database. The entity will be in the Unchanged state after calling this method.

Note that reverting through the request to database has some drawbacks:

  • network traffic
  • DB overload
  • the increased application response time
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Easy way without tracking any changes. It should be faster than looking at every entities.

public void Rollback()
{
    dataContext.Dispose();
    dataContext= new MyEntities(yourConnection);
}
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Simple indeed, but performance ? –  majkinetor Jul 1 '14 at 13:19
    
Time of creating a single entitity object... which is a couple of ms (50 ms). Looping through the collection may be a faster or longer depending of it's size. Performance wise O(1) is rarely a problem compare to O(n). Big O notation –  Guish Jul 2 '14 at 18:46
    
Not following you - performance of disposing and recreating connection. I tested it on existing project and it finished somewhat faster then above Rollback procedure, which makes it far better choice if one wants to revert entire database state. Rollback could cherry pick tho. –  majkinetor Jul 3 '14 at 12:02
    
'n' means the number of objects. Recreating connection take about 50 ms... O(1) means it is always the same time 50ms+0*n= 50ms. O(n) means the performance is influenced by the number of objects... performance is maybe 2ms+0.5ms*n... so bellow 96 objects it would be faster but time would increase linearly with the amount of data. –  Guish Jul 3 '14 at 14:56

As for me, better method to do it is to set EntityState.Unchanged on every entity you want to undo changes on. This assures changes are reverted on FK and has a bit more clear syntax.

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2  
Note: The changes will come back if the entity is changed again. –  Nick Whaley Mar 5 '12 at 16:03

"This worked for me:

dataContext.customer.Context.Refresh(RefreshMode.StoreWins, item);

Where item is the customer entity to be reverted."


I have made tests with ObjectContext.Refresh in SQL Azure, and the "RefreshMode.StoreWins" fires a query against database for each entity and causes a performance leak. Based on microsoft documentation ():

ClientWins : Property changes made to objects in the object context are not replaced with values from the data source. On the next call to SaveChanges, these changes are sent to the data source.

StoreWins : Property changes made to objects in the object context are replaced with values from the data source.

ClientWins isn't a good ideia neither, because firing .SaveChanges will commit "discarded" changes to the datasource.

I dont' know what's the best way yet, because disposing the context and creating a new one is caused a exception with message: "The underlying provider failed on open" when I try to run any query on a new context created.

regards,

Henrique Clausing

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// Undo the changes of all entries. 
foreach (DbEntityEntry entry in context.ChangeTracker.Entries()) 
{ 
    switch (entry.State) 
    { 
        // Under the covers, changing the state of an entity from  
        // Modified to Unchanged first sets the values of all  
        // properties to the original values that were read from  
        // the database when it was queried, and then marks the  
        // entity as Unchanged. This will also reject changes to  
        // FK relationships since the original value of the FK  
        // will be restored. 
        case EntityState.Modified: 
            entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged; 
            break; 
        case EntityState.Added: 
            entry.State = EntityState.Detached; 
            break; 
        // If the EntityState is the Deleted, reload the date from the database.   
        case EntityState.Deleted: 
            entry.Reload(); 
            break; 
        default: break; 
    } 
} 

It worked for me. However you must to reload your data from the context to bring the old data. Source here

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I found this to be working fine in my context:

Context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(customer, EntityState.Unchanged);

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I believe this will prevent changes to the entity from persisting upon calling DbContext.SaveChanges(), but it will not return the entity values to the original values. And if the entity state becomes modified from a later change, possibly all the previous modifications will be persisted upon saving? –  Carl G Dec 26 '12 at 4:37
1  
Check this link code.msdn.microsoft.com/How-to-undo-the-changes-in-00aed3c4 It says that setting an entity to Unchaged state restores the original values "under the covers". –  Hannish Oct 21 '13 at 13:56

This is an example of what Mrnka is talking about. The following method overwrites an entity's current values with the original values and doesn't call out the database. We do this by making use of the OriginalValues property of DbEntityEntry, and make use of reflection to set values in a generic way. (This works as of EntityFramework 5.0)

/// <summary>
/// Undoes any pending updates 
/// </summary>
public void UndoUpdates( DbContext dbContext )
{
    //Get list of entities that are marked as modified
    List<DbEntityEntry> modifiedEntityList = 
        dbContext.ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => x.State == EntityState.Modified).ToList();

    foreach(  DbEntityEntry entity in modifiedEntityList ) 
    {
        DbPropertyValues propertyValues = entity.OriginalValues;
        foreach (String propertyName in propertyValues.PropertyNames)
        {                    
            //Replace current values with original values
            PropertyInfo property = entity.Entity.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
            property.SetValue(entity.Entity, propertyValues[propertyName]); 
        }
    }
}
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Some good ideas above, I chose to implement ICloneable and then a simple extension method.

Found here: How do I clone a generic list in C#?

To be used as:

ReceiptHandler.ApplyDiscountToAllItemsOnReciept(LocalProductsOnReciept.Clone(), selectedDisc);

This way I was able to clone my product entities list, apply a discount to each item and not have to worry about reverting any changes on the original entity. No need to talk with the DBContext and ask for a refresh or work with the ChangeTracker. You might say I am not making full use of EF6 but this is a very nice and simple implementation and avoids a DB hit. I cannot say whether or not this has a performance hit.

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