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I have two separate text files, one with 4 letter words and one with 4 digit numbers, all on individual lines. The words in the on file correspond to the numbers on the same line in the other file. For example:

CATS
RATS
HATS

matches up with

2287
7287
4287

What I would like is to append the numbers to the end of their matching word, so it looks like this:

CATS2287
RATS7287
HATS4287

so far what I have is this:

for i in $(cat numbers); do  
  sed 's/$/'$i'/' words;
done

but the problem is a) that doesn't print/echo out to a new file and b) it loops through each word every time the first loop comes to a new number so in the end, all the words are paired up with the last number in the number file. Thanks in advance for the help.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
paste -d "" /path/to/letters /path/to/numbers

Proof of Concept

$ paste -d "" CATS NUMS
CATS2287
RATS7287
HATS4287
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@Tyler: there is a space between the -d and the double quotes "" –  SiegeX Mar 29 '11 at 1:16
    
thanks dude, paste was exactly what I was looking for. I can't believe I spent so much time fussing around with sed and awk. bash is an terrible, confusing language imo :\ –  Tyler Shambora Mar 29 '11 at 1:48
1  
@Tyler: it certainly can be at first, it definitely has its peculiarities. Stick with it though as knowing shell programming is pretty invaluable IMHO. Also, don't forget to accept the answer that best solved your problem. This helps you earn reputation as well as helps others with a similar question know where to look for a solution. P.S. Welcome to SO –  SiegeX Mar 29 '11 at 4:32
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You can use the excellent little paste(1) utility:

$ cat a
CATS
RATS
HATS
$ cat b
2287
7287
4287
$ paste -d "" a b
CATS2287
RATS7287
HATS4287
$ 

-d specifies a list of delimiters; I gave it a blank list: no delimiters, no delimiters.

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On Mac OS X:

paste -d "\0" <(echo abc) <(echo def)
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Hmm, my version of paste with -d"" just results in numbers, the words get overwritten (GNU paste 8.10 on cygwin). my input files have no carriage returns.

paste words numbers | tr -d '\t'

Also, just with shell builtins

exec 3<words
exec 4<numbers
while read -u3 word; do
  read -u4 num
  echo $word$num
done
exec 3<&-
exec 4<&-
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it's -d "" with a space, not -d"" –  SiegeX Mar 29 '11 at 1:24
    
@SiegeX, ah, interesting. Wonder if that's a bug –  glenn jackman Mar 29 '11 at 1:26
    
Oh, I get it now. With paste -d"" words numbers (no space before the "") paste is taking the word "words" as the delimiter list. So it is only pasting one file, "numbers". –  glenn jackman Mar 29 '11 at 13:34
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there are a few ways to do that

Paste:

paste -d "" file1 file2

awk

awk '{ getline f<"file2" ; print $0f}' file1

Bash:

exec 6<"file2"
while read -r line
do
    read -r S <&6
    printf "${line}${S}\n"
done <"file1"
exec >&6-

Ruby(1.9+)

ruby -ne 'BEGIN{f=File.open("file1")};print $_.chomp+f.readline;END{f.close}' file
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