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All,

code:

#=A===================
>>> b = [[1]*3]*3
>>> b 
[[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]
>>> b[0][0] = 0                 
>>> b
[[0, 1, 1], [0, 1, 1], [0, 1, 1]]
>>> 
#=B===================
>>> b = [[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]
>>> b[0][0] = 0
>>> b
[[0, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]
  1. Can I use the format may looks like "b = [[1]*3]*3" to get the same behavior as the "b = [[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]" to reduce type in?

  2. as "b = [[1]*3]*3" may return a "reference" based list, is it useful for daily works? any sample?

Thanks! KC

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I don't want to sound harsh, but your question gives me a headache :D Could you please rephrase ? –  Spyros Mar 29 '11 at 1:32
    
The two expressions do different things. Clearly, you can't use b = [[1]*3]*3 as your example proves. Since you've given a good proof that it won't work, what's your question? –  S.Lott Mar 29 '11 at 1:32
    
@S.Lott, this problem came from read post on web, when I read code "b = [[1]*3]*3", I think this expression is clearly and directly enough may reduce type in, but I am sure it is not able to work, yes, i understand it is a "reference" list, so I think is it possible to refine it and works same as "b = [[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]" to reduce type in, and as "b = [[1]*3]*3" may result as a "reference" based list, is it useful for daily works? –  user478514 Mar 29 '11 at 5:16
    
@user478514: Your example proves that b = [[1]*3]*3 cannot work same as b = [[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]. Since you have created absolute proof that the two cannot ever work the same, what more do you want? –  S.Lott Mar 29 '11 at 9:45
    
@S.Lott, as I said the "b = [[1]*3]*3" may looks easy to type than "b = [[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]", so what I need is an expression which buddies on below have given the answer "b = [[1]*3 for _ in range(3)]", more over, since "b = [[1]*3]*3" is also a grammar valid expression then I guess it may useful somehow... –  user478514 Mar 29 '11 at 14:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem with your code is that it references the same list, so when you do b[0][0] = 0, you are really updating the value at the reference(in which all three arrays point to).

To get the desired results, I would do(using list comprehension):

>>> b = [[1]*3 for _ in range(3)]
>>> b
[[1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]
>>> b[0][0] = 0
>>> b
[[0, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]]

which actually recreates a list, so it references different lists, rather than the same one in your answer.

b = [[1]*3 for _ in range(3)] is equivalent to:

b = []
for _ in range(3):
  b.append([1]*3)
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You could build your list with a list comprehension instead:

b = [[1]*3 for _ in range(3)]
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Your problem is that [[1, 1, 1]] * 3 creates a list of three references to the same [1, 1, 1] list. To do what you want, you have to create copies of [1, 1, 1] using list() or using slice notation:

first_list = [1, 1, 1]
second_list = [first_list[:], first_list[:], first_list[:]]

or

second_list = [list(first_list), list(first_list), list(first_list)]

To do the above in one line, you could do this:

second_list = [[1] * 3 for i in range(3)]
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At section A: you have a list with 3 items, but all items points to one object:

[1]*3

like this:

a = [1,1,1]
b = [a,a,a]

But at the section B , you have a list with different items

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