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I have this text sample

Ahmed 10
kmal 5
doola 6

And I am using this code to read it

if (myfile.is_open())
{
  while ( myfile.good() )
{

    myfile >> name;
    myfile >> phone;
    cout << name <<" "<<phone<<endl;

}
myfile.close();

}

I get this output

Ahmed 10
kmal 5
doola 6
doola 6

Why does this code read the last line twice ?

share|improve this question
    
Try while (myfile.good() && !myfile.eof()). –  Salehen Rahman Mar 29 '11 at 1:32
1  
See how to properly use stream flags: stackoverflow.com/questions/4258887/… –  GManNickG Mar 29 '11 at 1:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try

while( myfile >> name >> phone ) {
    // your code here
}

I believe the problem with the other approach is that eof isn't signaled until you actually try to read more than you should. That is, when you attempt to myfile >> name on the last round. That fails, as does myfile >> phone and only then do you break out of the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
This works fine . TY –  Ahmed Mar 29 '11 at 1:40

Don't use while(myfile.good()). It will still say true, even when you have read the last line in your file. And then the next >> will fail, leaving the name and phone variables unchanged from the last input. Use this instead: while(myfile >> name >> phone) {...}

share|improve this answer
1  
Same problem.... –  Ahmed Mar 29 '11 at 1:34
    
@Ahmed: Ché, I forgot that the same problem exists with eof(), sorry. :) Try the new version. –  Xeo Mar 29 '11 at 1:39

myfile.good() becomes false AFTER the read fails. Same with myfile.eof().

What you want is basically:

myfile >> name;
myfile >> phone;
if (!myfile.good()) break;

And this can be shortened to:

if (!(myfile >> name >> phone)) break;

or finally:

while (myfile >> name >> phone) { ... }
share|improve this answer

iostream status is not predictive. It reports the results of the previous operation, not of the next (which would be impossible to implement anyway). And myfile.good() isn't even a reliable indicator of the results of the previous operation: if the operation failed, it will be false, but if the operation succeeded, it's not necessarily true. Forget that function.

Use the fact that the stream can act as a boolean to test success of the previous operation. Once you have failure, you can then use eof(), and bad() to determine why (but with regards to eof(), only after failure---eof() may return true even if the previous operation succeeded). Thus:

while ( myfile >> name >> phone ) {
    //  ...
}
if ( myfile.bad() ) {
    std::cerr << "Hardware read error" << std::endl;
} else if ( !myfile.eof() ) {
    std::cerr << "Format error in file" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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