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i have a user input 'n' and i am finding the square root. Which i know is math.sqrt(n), but i need to make the program continue find the square root until it is less than 2. also return to the user how many times the program ran to find the root less than 2 using a counter. I am using python.

So far:

import math
root = 0
n = input('Enter a number greater than 2 for its root: ')

square_root = math.sqrt(n)
print 'The square root of', n, 'is', square_root

keep_going = 'y'

while keep_going == 'y':
    while math.sqrt(n) > 2:
        root = root + 1
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3  
If this is homework, please tag it as such. –  Oddthinking Mar 29 '11 at 2:46
    
What have you done? –  Hai Vu Mar 29 '11 at 2:47
    
You should put your code into your original question. This will make it readable, especially given python's use of indentation. –  JoshAdel Mar 29 '11 at 3:17
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3 Answers 3

import math
user_in = input()
num = int(user_in)

num = math.sqrt(num)
count = 1
while(num > 2):
  num = math.sqrt(num)
  count += 1

print count
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1  
raw_input for Python 2 of course :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 29 '11 at 2:52
2  
why would you solve people's homework like that... in 3 years he'll be sitting in a cubicle next to yours... –  iluxa Mar 29 '11 at 2:55
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Assuming 2.x

count = 0
user_input = int(raw_input("enter:"))
while true:    
    num = math.sqrt( user_input )
    if num < 2: break
    print num
    count+=1
print count    

Error checking for user input not present.

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Obvious way:

def sqrtloop(n):
    x = 0
    while n >= 2:
        n **= 0.5
        x += 1
    return x

Not that much:

def sqrtloop2(n):
    if n < 2:
        return 0
    return math.floor(math.log(math.log(n, 2), 2)) + 1
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Note that the Python Style Guide says that you should use spaces around augmented assignments (**=, +=), comparisons (<) and assignment (=) (except in function argument lists when defining defaults). Also, you should rather not write compound statements on one line, like if n < 2: return 0. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Mar 29 '11 at 8:06
    
@lazyr: All true. Fixed. –  Kabie Mar 29 '11 at 9:23
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