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I want to have multiple PyPI servers in my ~/.pypirc file so I can easily publish to different servers, depending on the project.

My use-case is this, I have some internal projects that I want to publish to an internal PyPI server (https://pypi.internal), and I have some public projects that I want to publish to the public PyPI.

This is my current attempt, but it doesn't work. I want to default to internal, and be required to add the -r pypi (to the setup.py command) if I want to publish to the public server.

[distutils]
index-servers =
    internal
    pypi

[internal]
repository: https://pypi.internal
username: brad

[pypi]
username: brad

Where am I going wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

It's strange that there isn't built-in support for setting a default, but here are two options which may help you work around it.

Option 1: Probably the simplest solution would be to leave your ~/.pypirc script intact and create shell aliases for your internal and public uploads. This may give you more control over customizing things for your workflow.

Given this .pypirc file:

[distutils]
index-servers =
    pypi
    internal

[pypi]
repository: http://pypi.python.org/pypi
username: brad
password: <pass>

[internal]
repository: http://localhost:8080
username: brad
password: <pass>

Create some shell aliases (place these definitions in your shell's rcfile, e.g. ~/.bashrc):

alias ppup_internal='python setup.py bdist_egg sdist upload -r internal'
alias ppup_public='python setup.py bdist_egg sdist upload'

Usage:

% ppup_internal
...
running upload
Submitting dist/foo-0.0.0.tar.gz to http://localhost:8080
Server response (200): OK

Option 2: A hack: you can work around the default by patching the default repository name at the top of your setup.py scripts.

from distutils import config
config.PyPIRCCommand.DEFAULT_REPOSITORY = 'internal'
from setuptools import setup

setup(
    name='foo',
    ...

Output:

% python setup.py sdist upload 
...
running upload
Submitting dist/foo-0.0.0.tar.gz to http://localhost:8080
Server response (200): OK

% python setup.py sdist upload -r pypi
...
running upload
Submitting dist/foo-0.0.0.tar.gz to http://pypi.python.org/pypi
Server response (200): OK

Background: If you define the [distutils] key in .pypirc, the upload command defaults to the pypi url when the -r [repo] argument is omitted. The relevant code is in distutils.config.PyPIRCCommand:

class PyPIRCCommand(Command):

    DEFAULT_REPOSITORY = 'http://pypi.python.org/pypi'

    def _read_pypirc(self):
        if os.path.exists(rc):
            self.announce('Using PyPI login from %s' % rc)
            repository = self.repository or self.DEFAULT_REPOSITORY
            realm = self.realm or self.DEFAULT_REALM

The old format of .pypirc expected a [server-login] section, which was far less flexible since it only defines a single target repository. This isn't a workable option since the [pypi] section below will be unusable:

[server-login]
repository: http://localhost:8080
username: brad
password: <pass>

[pypi]
repository: http://pypi.python.org/pypi
username: brad
password: <pass>

Now by default distutils will use this target:

% python setup.py sdist upload
...
running upload
Submitting dist/foo-0.0.0.tar.gz to http://localhost:8080
Server response (200): OK    

But you can't access the any other repos: it silently defaults to the [server-login] properties:

% python setup.py sdist upload -r pypi
...
running upload
Submitting dist/foo-0.0.0.tar.gz to http://localhost:8080
Server response (200): OK    
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Thanks for going the extra mile on this one. It's very disappointing that it's not supported. config.PyPIRCCommand.DEFAULT_REPOSITORY = 'internal' is a bit confusing, does it refer to a section in .pypirc, or is it a URL to the server? –  bradley.ayers Apr 2 '11 at 6:41
    
Yep, I thought it best to lay out all options I could find. The string internal is the name of the section in the .pypirc which you want to be your default. So in your .pypirc you named your local repository [internal] so that line in setup.py will monkey-patch the default to be internal. –  samplebias Apr 2 '11 at 16:27
    
oops, I didn't realise I had to award the bounty separately, there you go. –  bradley.ayers Apr 4 '11 at 21:54
    
@bradley - no problem, and thanks! –  samplebias Apr 4 '11 at 22:45
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A similar problem is when you want to have an internal PyPI package repository to install from. In this scenario using pip install -e . rather than python setup.py develop completely side-steps this problem. See Can I use `pip` instead of `easy_install` for `python setup.py install` dependency resolution?

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